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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tucker, Josiah 1711-1799 (search)
e head of a few regiments, they would march from one end of America to the other. All British writers and speakers exercised their pens and tongues in the same strain. Only one had the good sense to recommend a peaceful separation. That was Dean Tucker. He proposed that Parliament, by a solemn act declaring them to have forfeited all the privileges of British subjects by sea and land, should cut off the rebellious provinces from the British Empire; with provision, however, for granting paould have still retained a large and influential party in the colonies, the hatreds engendered by war would have been avoided, and, at the worst, the colonies would have been lost to Great Britain, as they finally were, without the expenditure of blood and treasure on both sides which the war caused. But vulgar expedients were preferred, and this proposition was denounced as the height of folly, and even the wise Burke called it childish. Dean Tucker died in Gloucester, England, Nov. 4, 1799.
pression of assent, When Mr. Grenville first hesitated a doubt of the unlimited supremacy of the British legislature, if he did not moot a point, that, perhaps, would not otherwise have been called in question, he conveyed to the discontented certain information, that they might depend upon the support of a party so considerable as to deserve the attention of the British ministry. Letter to Lord Geo. Germaine on the Rise, &c., of Rebellion in the Southern Colonies, pp. 9 and 10. Compare Dean Tucker's Fourth Tract. and was in itself a subject of censure and discontent among the more thorough reformers of colonial governments. No hope was given that parliament would forego taxing America. On the contrary, it was held to be its bounden duty to do so. To a considerate and most respectable merchant, a member of the House of Commons, who was making a representation against proceeding with the stamp act, Grenville answered, If the stamp duty is disliked, I am willing to change it for a
xportation without advancing the duties.. In executing the Stamp Act, it was further provided, that the revenue to be derived from it should not be remitted to England, but constitute a part of the sum to be expended in America. Franklin to Dean Tucker, 26 Feb. 1774. Tucker to Franklin. Grenville also resolved to select the stamp officers for America from among the Americans themselves; and the friends and agents of the colonies were invited to make the nominations; and they did so, FraTucker to Franklin. Grenville also resolved to select the stamp officers for America from among the Americans themselves; and the friends and agents of the colonies were invited to make the nominations; and they did so, Franklin Geo. III. c. XLV. C. Jenkinson to Secretary Pownall, 19 March, 1765. among the rest. You tell me, said the minister, you are poor, and unable to bear the tax; others tell me you are able. Now, take the business into your own hands; you will see how and where it pinches, and will certainly let us know it; in which case it shall be eased. Ingersoll to Assembly of Connecticut, Sept. 1765. Every agent in England believed the stamp tax chap. XI.} 1765. April. would be peacefully l