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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
as fresh in my mind as though they were of yesterday. As I recall that period, nothing seems more remarkable to me than the absolute surprise the fall of Richmond caused in Richmond itself. Whether or not it was anticipated by the government, I do not know; but there can be no doubt that outside of official circles—that is, to almost every one in the city—the announcement came with the unexpectedness and surprise of an earthquake. My father, Dr. David Hunter Tucker, son of Hon. Henry St George Tucker and grandson of Judge St. George Tucker; Medical Author and Emeritus Professor, Medical College of Virginia. who, at the commencement of the struggle, entered the Confederate army as a surgeon, was at the time in charge of or connected with the medical department of Libby Prison, and, from both his official position and social standing, had more than usual opportunity for observing and knowing the trend of events. But I am sure neither he nor one of his associates who lived with
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
as fresh in my mind as though they were of yesterday. As I recall that period, nothing seems more remarkable to me than the absolute surprise the fall of Richmond caused in Richmond itself. Whether or not it was anticipated by the government, I do not know; but there can be no doubt that outside of official circles—that is, to almost every one in the city—the announcement came with the unexpectedness and surprise of an earthquake. My father, Dr. David Hunter Tucker, son of Hon. Henry St George Tucker and grandson of Judge St. George Tucker; Medical Author and Emeritus Professor, Medical College of Virginia. who, at the commencement of the struggle, entered the Confederate army as a surgeon, was at the time in charge of or connected with the medical department of Libby Prison, and, from both his official position and social standing, had more than usual opportunity for observing and knowing the trend of events. But I am sure neither he nor one of his associates who lived with