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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
aving served in the Confederate Army, he went to Georgia, where he remained until 1869, when his disabilities having been removed, he returned to Winchester and resumed the practice of law. He served as County Attorney for Clark County, and in 1871-2 he represented the county in the State Legislature, where he was recognized as one of the abest members of that body. He died in Winchester on September 28, 1906, in his eighty-third year. His wife and two children, Miss Nannie Tucker and Mr. Hood Tucker, survive him. Colonel McCreary. James B. McCreary was born in Madison County, Ky., July 8, 1839; graduated when eighteen years old at Center College, in 1859 graduated in the law department of Cumberland University, Tenn., with first honors in a class of forty-seven members, and at once began the practice of law in Richmond. After his capture at Cheshire, Ohio., he was incarcerated in the Ohio penitentiary, and afterwards at Fort Delaware, Del., and later at Morris Island, S. C.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the companies. (search)
instrumental in recruiting this, the first company raised for Chenault's Regiment. It was recruited in Clark County, at a meeting and barbecue given on the farm of Mr. Jackson's mother, at Jackson's Ferry, on Friday, September 2, 1862, where Colonel Tucker and Major McCreary made speeches. An eye witness of the scene writes: When Colonel Tucker and Major McCreary spoke at Jackson's Ferry, they stood on the balcony of the residence of the venerable Mrs. Anna Jackson. A beautiful daughter of thColonel Tucker and Major McCreary spoke at Jackson's Ferry, they stood on the balcony of the residence of the venerable Mrs. Anna Jackson. A beautiful daughter of this historic family, Miss Mary Virginia Jackson, waved over their heads a Confederate flag. Full of life, beauty and enthusiasm, her cheering voice would ring out Fall in boys, the South needs you, and the boys fell in. Mrs. Jackson and her lovely daughter were afterwards arrested for giving aid and comfort to the Rebellion, and were incarcerated in a military prison. On their release they were put under heavy bonds. Miss Mary Virginia Jackson married the late William H. Eaton, of Winchester,