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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
. N., and of Mr. C. H. Stevens, afterward brigadier-general in the Confederate army, and both from South Carolina, is attributable also the revolution in naval architecture and armaments by which iron-clad war vessels have entirely superseded the now almost obsolete wooden men-of-war.--G. T. B. There were two Confederate gun-boats (iron-clad rams) at that time in Charleston, the Palmetto State and the Chicora. Lieutenant-Commander John Rutledge, C. S. N., commanded the first, and Captain John R. Tucker, C. S. N., commanded the second. Besides these there were three small harbor steamers, to be used as tenders for them. The Palmetto State and the Chicora were, unfortunately, of too heavy a draught to be of much practical use in the defense of the harbor. They were also lacking in motive power, consequently in speed; and their guns, on account of the smallness of the port-holes, could not be sufficiently Castle Pinckney, Charleston Harbor. ciently elevated, and were of but very
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
of tin-foil. Rolled up in this was a sheet of tissue paper on which was written the famous dispatch so widely published at the time, in which Sheridan Captain John R. Tucker, C. S. N. From a photograph. described the situation at Jetersville, and added: I wish you were here yourself. The general said he would go at once toa little ravine which leads nearly at right angles toward Sailor's Creek. General G. W. C. Lee was on the left with the Naval Battalion, under Commodore [John R.] Tucker, behind his right. Kershaw's division was on the right. All of Lee's and part of Kershaw's divisions were posted behind a rising ground that afforded some sheltof his general officers [including Kershaw, G. W. C. Lee, Barton, Du Bose, Hunton, and Corse], and about all his gallant army that survived, were prisoners. Commodore Tucker and his Marine Brigade, numbering about 2000, surrendered to me a little later. They were under cover of a dense forest, and had been passed by in the first