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Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 3: from New York to Richmond (search)
commend him to the Southern people, lost nothing in the telling. He was not only honorably discharged, but he was vociferously cheered by the entire audience, and he walked out of the court-room the idol of the hour — the rest of the last rebel reinforcement from the North shining somewhat in his reflected light. Thus, to our great relief, the awkward contretemps of his arrest contributed rather to the reputation and advantage of our friend. I recall this additional incident: Mr. John Randolph Tucker-Ran. Tucker --then Attorney-General of Virginia, was an intimate friend of my father, who had now arrived in Richmond, and suggested to him that Mr. Beers and I, as we were citizens of the State of Connecticut where I had recently cast my first vote, were in rather an exceptional position, as bearing upon a possible charge of treason, in case we should enlist in the military service. The suggestion was deemed of sufficient importance to refer to Mr. Benjamin, then Attorney-General
apprehended, restrained or secured, and removed as alien enemies. The President of the Confederacy was authorized to issue a proclamation to carry this act into effect. Accordingly, all residents of other States adhering to the Union were ordered to depart within forty days, subject only to the provision that they should not be allowed to cross the lines at such times and places as would result in their giving information to the Federals. A commission consisting of two citizens, John Randolph Tucker and James Lyon, was appointed on August 30th, on the suggestion of General J. H. Winder, who wrote to the Secretary of War on the 26th of August that he believed that many prisoners who had been arrested should be discharged. The commissioners at once entered on their work and a general jail delivery ensued. Military officers were also instructed to obey the writs of habeas corpus, and if the judge ordered the discharge of the prisoner, to obey, though they might then appeal to the
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 5: Bible and colportage work. (search)
ce and help of our best men, as the following will show. Hon. John Randolph Tucker has been for years a member of the Presbyterian Church, aor Christ. Messrs. Editors: The following letter from John Randolph Tucker, Esq., Attorney-General of Virginia, will be of service to the cause I have the honor to represent. Mr. Tucker evinces the depth and sincerity of his conviction in this matter by his deeds, as, in addi shall be full of glory. I am, dear sir, yours, very truly, J. R. Tucker. And the following report of a grand mass-meeting held in idents of much interest were narrated. He was followed by John Randolph Tucker, Esq., in a speech of great power and eloquence. Mr. TuckerMr. Tucker thought it augured well for the country that such an immense audience had assembled, notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather, to considk has the most weighty claims upon all classes of the community. Mr. Tucker closed with an eloquent tribute to President Davis. In all his r
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
e. depository, Dalton, April 30, 1864. The following report of operations and labors in the Army of Tennessee for the present month is respectfully submitted: I have visited the Brigades of Generals Brown, Bate, Reynolds, Walthal, Finley, Tucker, Lowry, Gist, Stephens, Wright and Roddy. I have universally met with warm welcomes and kindly greetings by the officers and soldiers of each command. Three of the above-named generals are consistent members of the Church, and are wielding themp service, and a number have been converted at their late protracted meeting. Walthal's Brigade has no chaplain at present, but I learn that preachers, who are private soldiers, are conducting a good meeting—many penitents and conversions. Tucker's Mississippi Brigade has been favored with a revival meeting for several weeks. Over one hundred have been converted, 90 have joined the Church, and two nights ago there were 140 penitents at the altar. Finley's Florida Brigade reports 130 a
at the battle of Cedar Creek, on the morning of September 9th, in the absence of General Sherman, confessed to him that the Sixth corps was as badly damaged, or nearly so, as were the Eighth and Ninth, by Early's attack, and was, in his opinion, in no condition to resist a third attack, if such had been made. On the 27th of February, the regular monthly court day of Augusta county, there was a large meeting of the citizens of the city and county, which was earnestly addressed by Hon. John Randolph Tucker, Hon. A. H. H. Stuart and others, in reference to supplying the wants of Lee's army. The meeting was quite enthusiastic, and a large subscription of supplies and money was promptly made by those present. On the 28th of February the enemy was reported as again marching up the Valley with a large force, rumor saying that it was Hancock with 20,000 men. Its advance reached Mt. Jackson the night of the 27th and approached Harrisonburg late on the 28th. Great excitement prevailed i
ngers. Transferred to Fifteenth Cavalry): Critcher, John, major. Fifteenth Cavalry regiment (consolidated with Fifth regiment, November 8, 1864): Ball, William B., colonel; Burroughs, Edgar, major; Collins, Charles Read, major, colonel; Critcher, John, lieutenant-colonel. Fifteenth Infantry regiment: August, Thomas P., colonel; Clarke, Charles H., major; Crenshaw, James R., lieutenant-colonel; Morrison, Emmet M., major, lieutenant-colonel; Peyton, Thomas G., major, lieutenant-colonel; Tucker, St. George, major, lieutenant-colonel; Walker, John Stewart, major. Sixteenth Cavalry battalion (transferred to Thirteenth Cavalry): Belsches, Benjamin W., major. Sixteenth Cavalry regiment: Ferguson, Milton J., colonel; Graham, William L., lieutenant-colonel; Nounnan, James H., major. Sixteenth Infantry regiment: Colston, Raleigh E., colonel; Crump, Charles A., colonel; Crutchfield, Stapleton, colonel; Ham, Joseph H., lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Holladay, Francis D., major; Page,
was born at Drummondtown, Accomack county, December 3, 1806, a descendant of John Wise, who came to Virginia from England about 1650, and was a man of influence in the colony. Maj. John Wise, father of General Wise, clerk of Accomack county and twice speaker of the Virginia senate, died in 1812, and his wife, Sarah Corbin, in 1813. Young Wise was cared for by his kinsmen, and educated at Washington college, Pa. After his graduation in 1825, he studied law three years with Henry St. George Tucker, and in 1828 removed to Nashville, Tenn., for the practice of his profession. Returning to Accomack in 1831, he soon became prominent politically, and in 1833, as a supporter of Jackson, was elected to Congress, the contest at the polls being followed by a duel in which his opponent for Congress was wounded. He was re-elected in 1835 and again in 1837, and was a zealous advocate of the admission of Texas. In 1837 he acted as second in a duel between William J. Graves, of Kentucky, and Jon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
rning, which was a tedious operation, besides subjecting us twice to the full fire of the batteries, some of which we silenced We were accompanied from the yard by the gunboats Beaufort, Lieutenant-Commander W. H Parker, and Raleigh, LieutenantCom-mander J. W. Alexander. As soon as the firing was heard up James river, the Patrick Henry, Commander John R Tucker, Jamestown, Lieutenant Commander J. N. Barney, and the gunboat Teaser, Lieutenant-Commander W. A. Webb, under command of Captain John R. Tucker, stood down the river, joining us about four o'clock. All these vessels were gallantly fought and handled, and rendered valuable and effective service. The prisoners from the Congress stated that when on board that ship it was seen that we were standing up the river, that three cheers were given under the impression that we had quit the fight. They were soon undeceived. When they saw us heading down stream, fearing the fate of the Cumberland, they slipped their cables, made sail
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). (search)
rning, which was a tedious operation, besides subjecting us twice to the full fire of the batteries, some of which we silenced We were accompanied from the yard by the gunboats Beaufort, Lieutenant-Commander W. H Parker, and Raleigh, LieutenantCom-mander J. W. Alexander. As soon as the firing was heard up James river, the Patrick Henry, Commander John R Tucker, Jamestown, Lieutenant Commander J. N. Barney, and the gunboat Teaser, Lieutenant-Commander W. A. Webb, under command of Captain John R. Tucker, stood down the river, joining us about four o'clock. All these vessels were gallantly fought and handled, and rendered valuable and effective service. The prisoners from the Congress stated that when on board that ship it was seen that we were standing up the river, that three cheers were given under the impression that we had quit the fight. They were soon undeceived. When they saw us heading down stream, fearing the fate of the Cumberland, they slipped their cables, made sail
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
funds for its completion, as they held it should be regarded a privilege to contribute to such an object. The exercises took place in the University chapel. Hon. J. R. Tucker, Rev. Dr. Weddell, General R. D. Lilly, General Joseph E. Johnston, General W. N. Pendleton, ex- Governor Letcher, General F. H. Smith, Rev. Dr. Mullally, Getion by Senator Withers. Professor White announced that the ceremonies of laying the corner-stone would be conducted by General Joseph E. Johnston and Hon. John Randolph Tucker, and the audience repairing to the northeast corner of the building, General Johnston, after paying a short but feeling tribute to the memory of Lee, proe splendid success of their programme on this grand historic occasion. The Marylanders spent the afternoon and evening in serenading General G. W. C. Lee, Hon. J. R. Tucker, ex-Governor John Letcher, Mrs. Jackson and Miss Julia, Mrs. Stuart and others, and they received universal praise for their soldierly appearance and manly
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