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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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serve such scenes as inspired Albert Pike's stanzas to the tune of ‘Dixie.’ The ram Vindicator above is particularly apt, since ‘Dixie’ first appeared in a ‘River’ town, being printed in the Natchez Courier on April 30, 1862. It is a curious fact that the author was born in Boston and attended Harvard. The tune itself had a Northern origin. Daniel Decatur Emmet, who had traveled a great deal with circus bands and a minstrel company of his own, and was already known as the composer of ‘Old Dan Tucker,’ joined the famous Bryant's Minstrels in 1857. He not only appeared in the performances, but composed airs for the entertainments. The closing number on each occasion was known as a ‘walk-around,’ in which all members of the company would appear. One Saturday night, September 17, 1859, Emmet was told to prepare a new walk-around for the following Monday rehearsal. Sunday was gloomy, with a cold rain falling. As Emmet looked out the window an expression with which he ha
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
ollectors for the Central West. Some well-known examples of game-songs, most of them imported from the Old World, are Weevilly Wheat, Juniper tree, Skip to My Lou, The Needle's eye, Happy is the Miller, We're marching Round the Levy; some favourite game-songs of the Central West are Bounce a round, We'll all go down to Rowser's, Pig in the parlour. Beside traditional pieces and those of obscure origin, modern songs of all kinds have been utilized in play-party games: minstrel songs—as Old Dan Tucker, Angelina Baker, Jim along Jo, Buffalo Gals—and the popular street songs, Nelly Gray, Little Brown Jug, John Brown's body, Captain Jinks of the horse Marines. The modern pieces are likeliest to escape mutilation, at least so long as they retain currency as separate songs. Even hymns, scraps of glee club songs, and Mother Goose rhymes are sometimes utilized to form accompaniments to dances. New stanzas are welcomed, and local adaptations, irrelevant or facetious. Judging from recorded
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
nguage of Chaucer, 484 Observations on the source and effects of unequal wealth, 436 O'Callaghan, E. B., 179, 180 Ocean burial, 514 Octopus, the, 93 Octoroon, the, 266 Ode in time of hesitation, 64 Ode on the Unveiling of the Shaw Memorial on Boston common, 37 Ode to Shelley, 41 Oertel, Hanns, 469 Officer 666, 295 Ogden, Peter Skene, 137, 139 O. Henry. See Porter, W. S. Oithono, 582 O Keepa, A Religious Ceremony, 149 Old and New, 121 Old Cambridge, 119 Old Dan Tucker, 516 Old Grumbly, 511 Old Homestead, 285 Old Lavender, 279 Old man under the Hill, the, 514 Old New York, 179 Old regime in Canada, the, 190 Old Santa Fe Trail, the, 133 Old Schoolhouse on the Creek, the, 584 Old South Leaflets, 166 Old sweetheart of mine, an, 6 Old Swimmina Hole and 'Leven more poems, the, 60 Oldtown Folks, 72, 73 Old Virginia and her Neighbors, 193 Olive branch, the, 432 Oliver Goldsmith, 283 Ollantay Tambo, 625 Olmsted, Frederic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How Dixie came to be written. (search)
How Dixie came to be written. Dixie, the most popular song of the South during the Civil War, was written by a Northern man, Daniel Decatur Emmett, who was born at Mount Vernon, Ohio, in 1815. Young Emmett began life as a printer, but soon afterward gave up type-setting to join a band of musicians connected with a circus company. He discovered that he had a talent for conposing songs used by clowns and he reeled them off in numbers, and with much success. Old Dan Tucker made a great hit. Emmett became so popular that he concluded to try New York City, at the Old Gotham Theatre. His performances, with the help of two companions, were of a mixed negro song and dance kind, and the little company was billed as The Virginia Minstrels. They took the New York crowd by storm, and the result was the negro minstrel shows which have ever since had so great a run. The company went abroad and had great success in England. Even royalty became enthusiastic, and the present King, who