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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Introduction. (search)
American colonies before the American Revolution drew from Burke one of the most gorgeous bursts of eloquence in our language,--in any language. They were all but annihilated by the Revolution, but they furnished the men who followed Manly, and Tucker, and Biddle, and Paul Jones to the jaws of death. Reviving after the war, they attracted the notice of the First Congress, and were recommended to their favor by Mr. Jefferson, then Secretary of State. This favor was at first extended to them i fearful import. In the same year the Constitution was framed. It recognized the existence of Slavery, but the word was carefully excluded from the instrument, and Congress was authorized to abolish the traffic in twenty years. In 1796, Mr. St. George Tucker, law professor in William and Mary College in Virginia, published a treatise entitled, a Dissertation on Slavery, with a proposal for the gradual abolition of it in the State of Virginia. In the preface to the essay, he speaks of the abo
m, escapes to Europe, D. 101 Treason, what it is in South Carolina, D. 9; defined by Judge Ogden, D. 60 Trenton, N. J., Union resolutions of, D. 15 Trescott, —, his diplomatic history, Int. 13 Trimble, —, Gen., of Baltimore, his clearance papers, P. 80 Trimble, J. R., Colonel, Doc. 134 Trinity Church, N. Y., American flag displayed from, D. 33 Tripp, —, Capt., D. 30 Troy, N. Y., Union meeting at, D. 27 Tucker, —, Attorney-Gen., D. 14 Tucker, St. George, of Va., his Dissertation on Slavery, Int. 33 Twiggs, David E., Gen., surrenders U. S. property in Texas, D. 17; expelled from U. S. service, D. 18; his treachery approved, D. 22; a favorite of Buchanan, P. 24; in command of Louisiana dept. D. 86; appointed Major-General in the Confederate army, D. 90; notice of, D. 95; amount of property lost by the treason of, Doc. 35; his letter to Buchanan, P. 131 Tyler, B. O., Captain, U. S. A., D. 83 ----, Captain, U. S. A., D. 66 --
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tucker, St. George 1752-1828 (search)
Tucker, St. George 1752-1828 Jurist; born in Port Royal, Bermuda, July 10, 1752; graduated at the College of William and Mary in 1772; studied law, but entered the public service at the beginning of the Revolutionary War, planning and assisting personally in the seizure of a large amount of stores in a fortification at Bermuda. He commanded a regiment at the siege of Yorktown, where he was severely wounded. After the war he became a Virginia legislator, a reviser and digester of the laws s in 1786 which led to that of 1787 that framed the national Constitution. He was a judge in the State courts nearly fifty years, and of the court of appeals from 1803 to 1811. In 1813 he was made a judge of the United States district court. Judge Tucker was possessed of fine literary taste and keen wit, and he was a poet of no ordinary ability. He wrote some poetical satires under the name of Peter Pindar; also some political tracts; and in 1803 published an annotated edition of Blackstone.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
nder proclamation of the President, Aug. 19, 1893; 100,000 persons make a rush for the 6,000,000 acres of land......Sept. 16, 1893 Centennial of the laying of the cornerstone of the Capitol celebrated at Washington; William Wirt Henry, of Virginia, chief orator......Sept. 18, 1893 Destructive storm on the Gulf of Mexico; over 2,000 lives lost along the coast, with a large loss of property on......Oct. 2, 1893 Pan-American Bimetallic Convention meets at St. Louis......Oct. 3, 1893 Tucker bill to repeal the federal election laws passes the House by 201 to 102; not voting, fifty......Oct. 10, 1893 Senate sits continuously to force a vote on the repeal bill, from 11 A. M. Wednesday, Oct. 11, to 1.45 A. M. Friday, when it adjourns for want of a quorum. Senator Allen, of Nebraska, holds the floor for fourteen hours, in the longest continuous speech ever made in the Senate......Oct. 13, 1893 American yacht Vigilant wins the third of five races for the America's cup, off San
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Index. (search)
passing through, by Mrs. Child, x. Thirteenth Amendment to U. S. Constitution, passage of, 188. Thome, James A., denounces slavery, 131. Thompson, George, threatened with abduction from New York, 15; speaks in the hall of the U. S. House of Representatives, 180; contrast between his first and last visits to the United States, 181; his explanation of England's attitude during the war, 181; lines to, 206; reminiscences of, 248. Tubinan, Harriet, alias Moses, 161. Tucker, St. George, testimony of, against slavery, 132, U. uncle Tom's Cabin, success of, 69; read in Siam, 216. Underwood, John C., expelled from Virginia, 108. Unitarianism a mere half-way house, 189. Unitarians, the, and R. W. Emerson, 34; convocation of, at New York, 189. V. Venus of Milo, the, 172, 218. Victor Hugo's tragedy of John Brown, 173. W. Wallcut, Robert F., 284. War anecdotes, 158, 161, 180, 204. Wasson, David A.. 80, 91. Wayland, Mass., Mrs. Child's home
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
els in New England and New York, 201, 201 n., 203, 205 Travels, Voyages and Adventures of Gilbert Go-Ahead, The, 154 Treason's lost device, 283 Trent, W. P., 304 Tribune (N. Y.), 156, 187, 188, 189, 191, 192, 193, 194, 266 n. Trimmer, Mrs., 397, 400 Trinity College, 277 Troilus and Cressida, 361 Trollope, Mrs., 127 Trowbridge, J. T., 402, 405 Trumbull, Benjamin, 106, 108, 111 Trumbull, John, 150, 207 Truth about Horace, the, 241 Tucker, George, 110, 111 Tucker, St. George, 305 Tuckerman, H. T., 58 n. Tudor, William, 105, 164 Tufts College, 207 n. Turn of the Screw, the, 375 Turner, J. A., 348, 349, 350, 354 Tuskegee, 324 Twice told tales, 16, 19, 21, 63, 64, 173 Two Rivulets, the, 265 Two years before the Mast, 225, 399, 400 n. Tyler, President, 93 n. Tyler, Moses Coit, 149 Tyler, Royall, 241 Tyndall, 221 Uhland, 40 Ulalume, 66 Ultima Thule, 40 Uncle of an Angel, 388 Uncle Remus and Brer rabbit, 350
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
27 Trinity College (S. C.), 305 Trip to Chinatown, a, 279, 513 Troilus and Cressida, 482 Trowbridge, J. T., 306, 352 True civilization, 437 True Constitution of government in the sovereignty of the individual, the, 437 True interest of the United States . . . considered, the, 429 Truman, B. C., 352 Trumbull, 539, 542 Truth, the, 283, 284 Truth advanced, 535 Truth and fiction, 598 Tubingen (University), 468 Tucker, Beverley, 67 Tucker, George, 434, 438 Tucker, St. George, 495 Tucker, W. J., 215 Tuckerman, H. T., 18, 487 Tuckerman, Joseph, 215 Tulane University, 598 Tully, R. W., 281 Turgenev, 81, 105 Turgot, 430 Turner, F. J., 52 Turnermarsch, 581 Turn of the Screw, the, 104 Twenty Sermons, 218 n. Twin Beds, 295 Twining, W. J., 153 Two Brothers, the, 507, 509 Two lectures on political economy, 434 Two little girls in Blue, 513 Two orphans, the, 271 Two sisters, the, 507 Two tracts on the proposed Al
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
yesterday. As I recall that period, nothing seems more remarkable to me than the absolute surprise the fall of Richmond caused in Richmond itself. Whether or not it was anticipated by the government, I do not know; but there can be no doubt that outside of official circles—that is, to almost every one in the city—the announcement came with the unexpectedness and surprise of an earthquake. My father, Dr. David Hunter Tucker, son of Hon. Henry St George Tucker and grandson of Judge St. George Tucker; Medical Author and Emeritus Professor, Medical College of Virginia. who, at the commencement of the struggle, entered the Confederate army as a surgeon, was at the time in charge of or connected with the medical department of Libby Prison, and, from both his official position and social standing, had more than usual opportunity for observing and knowing the trend of events. But I am sure neither he nor one of his associates who lived with us had the least idea that the end, if ne
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
yesterday. As I recall that period, nothing seems more remarkable to me than the absolute surprise the fall of Richmond caused in Richmond itself. Whether or not it was anticipated by the government, I do not know; but there can be no doubt that outside of official circles—that is, to almost every one in the city—the announcement came with the unexpectedness and surprise of an earthquake. My father, Dr. David Hunter Tucker, son of Hon. Henry St George Tucker and grandson of Judge St. George Tucker; Medical Author and Emeritus Professor, Medical College of Virginia. who, at the commencement of the struggle, entered the Confederate army as a surgeon, was at the time in charge of or connected with the medical department of Libby Prison, and, from both his official position and social standing, had more than usual opportunity for observing and knowing the trend of events. But I am sure neither he nor one of his associates who lived with us had the least idea that the end, if ne