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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Twiggs or search for Twiggs in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
way, for on leaving it to a vote as to whether they would reenlist, a majority decided against reenlistment. This disbandment was under the construction of the War Department. General Taylor, after the disbandment of General Johnston's regiment, appointed him inspector general of the field division of volunteers, under Major General Butler, which he accepted, desirous as he was to participate in the campaign then opening. General Johnston in describing the attack made by Generals Worth and Twiggs, and the gallant charge made by the Tennesseeans and Mississippians, proceeds to speak of that portion of the field occupied by the Ohio regiment under Colonel Mitchell. He says: Colonel Mitchell's Ohio regiment entered the town more to the right, and attacked the works with great courage and spirit. But here was concentrated the fire of all the enemy's works. From this point, or a little in the rear, the regulars had been forced back, with great loss of officers and men. Having been orde
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
way, for on leaving it to a vote as to whether they would reenlist, a majority decided against reenlistment. This disbandment was under the construction of the War Department. General Taylor, after the disbandment of General Johnston's regiment, appointed him inspector general of the field division of volunteers, under Major General Butler, which he accepted, desirous as he was to participate in the campaign then opening. General Johnston in describing the attack made by Generals Worth and Twiggs, and the gallant charge made by the Tennesseeans and Mississippians, proceeds to speak of that portion of the field occupied by the Ohio regiment under Colonel Mitchell. He says: Colonel Mitchell's Ohio regiment entered the town more to the right, and attacked the works with great courage and spirit. But here was concentrated the fire of all the enemy's works. From this point, or a little in the rear, the regulars had been forced back, with great loss of officers and men. Having been orde
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee and Scott. (search)
of the United States, was at Washington city. Colonel Lee, in command of his regiment, was stationed in Texas—Governor Anderson living at San Antonio, Texas. General Twiggs was in command of the military department of Texas. On November 20th, 1860, Governor Anderson had made a speech at a secession meeting at the Alamo, opposiges very improbable. These papers General Scott enclosed to Governor Anderson, and, in a private note, requested Governor Anderson to exhibit the paper to General Twiggs and Colonel Lee especially, and to such other officers of the army as he might deem advisable. The paper was left with Twiggs and with Lee, each retaining Twiggs and with Lee, each retaining it for several days. Some time after General Lee had read and returned these papers to Governor Anderson, the arrangement had been made by which the army of the United States in Texas was surrendered to the Committee of Vigilance, consisting of Messrs. Maverick, Divine and Luckett, all of which, being a part of the general histor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correction of errors in statement of Governor Anderson, and letter of General Echols. (search)
then existing in the Confederate army, and to the highest rank of the officers who were transferred by Virginia, as was due to the position he held in that army. The relative rank of officers who left the Army of the United States and joined that of the Confederacy was fixed by the law of March 14th, 1861; beyond this the Executive had authority to select General officers, with the limitation that, after the army was organized, the selection must be made from the officers thereof. Brigadier-General Twiggs was the highest in rank of the officers who left the United States army to serve the Confederacy, and under our law must have had the highest rank if he had been willing to enter for the general service; he declined to do so, and was commissioned in the provisional army. So much for the fictitious engagement with Sidney Johnston for first command. But, yet further, it may be stated that when Lee left the United States army and took service with Virginia, and when he was commissi