hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 60 8 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 7 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Edward Twisleton or search for Edward Twisleton in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 9 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
posal—with servants and all appliances—in the absence of its owners, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Twisleton, Hon. Edward Twisleton, a man of remarkMrs. Edward Twisleton, Hon. Edward Twisleton, a man of remarkable cultivation, much beloved and respected in the best society of England, had recently married a favorite niece of Mrs. Ticknor, Miss ElleHon. Edward Twisleton, a man of remarkable cultivation, much beloved and respected in the best society of England, had recently married a favorite niece of Mrs. Ticknor, Miss Ellen Dwight. Mr. Ticknor, too, was very fond of Mrs. Twisleton, and, before there had been any question of this marriage, Mr. Twisleton had beenMrs. Twisleton, and, before there had been any question of this marriage, Mr. Twisleton had been much liked by him and all his family. These interesting and highly valued persons are now dead, and their loss has been deeply felt on eitheMr. Twisleton had been much liked by him and all his family. These interesting and highly valued persons are now dead, and their loss has been deeply felt on either side of the ocean, for both had made themselves loved in the new circles they had entered by their marriage. and from thence Mr. Ticknor wre arrival of the party; and later a meeting was arranged there, with Mr. and Mrs. Twisleton and her sister, that was delightful; besides whicMrs. Twisleton and her sister, that was delightful; besides which Dean and Mrs. Milman passed through about the same time. One pleasant afternoon, especially, this tripartite party of American and English
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
very, and a package received at Southampton confirmed these good reports. Mr. Ticknor parted there from his wife and daughter, and when they sailed for America he went to London to complete the work he had undertaken. He was there the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Twisleton, who were at home in their pretty house at Rutland Gate, and his time was filled, as in the previous year, with a perpetual contrast of really arduous and earnest work with the excitement of a most stimulating intellectual socie Ticknor parted there from his wife and daughter, and when they sailed for America he went to London to complete the work he had undertaken. He was there the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Twisleton, who were at home in their pretty house at Rutland Gate, and his time was filled, as in the previous year, with a perpetual contrast of really arduous and earnest work with the excitement of a most stimulating intellectual society in every form. All this is described in his daily letters to Mrs. Ticknor.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
London, July 3, 1857. Dearest wife,—I am here safe in gentle Ellen's Mrs. Twisleton. kind care. I wish I could add that I am easy in my thoughts. . . . . I wa she came immediately after, and received me most sweetly and affectionately; Twisleton followed, with hearty kindness. We breakfasted, and set off for Harrow at on and I suppose a dozen more. July 9.—We had a most delightful breakfast at Twisleton's this morning: Tocqueville, Sir Edmund Head, Senior, Stirling, Lord Glenelg,with whom I had a very interesting talk; then, after a walk for exercise with Twisleton, in Kensington Gardens,—the first I have been able to take since I came to Lod a small party consisting of the Pertzes and two or three others. Ellen and Twisleton were engaged elsewhere, for which I was sorry, for Sir Edmund was in great ferd dance in Tam O'Shanter, grows fast and furious. . . . . At half past 11 Twisleton, Ellen, and I reached Lord Lansdowne's to a great concert. . . . . I could n<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
male at Twickenham, where I should have met the Comte de Paris and most of the Orleans family. . . . . I left Ellen and Twisleton with a pretty sad feeling, as well as with a wearied body and jaded spirits, and came down to Colonel Harcourt and Ladyountry, but at the end rose the huge, black, shapeless city. . . . . Ellen received me most affectionately, . . . . and Twisleton with his usual heartiness broke out, You must go and hear the great debate tonight, in the Commons. It was on the Divort, and a little urging on his, I determined to go. The Twisletons were to dine with Lord Say and Sele, Brother of Mr. Twisleton. but I had declined the invitation; so I hurried to the Athenaeum for a bachelor's dinner, and there found Kinglake a . When we reached town,—just before seven,—I drove directly to the Athenaeum, where, by previous appointment, I met Twisleton, who has come to town for two nights to attend a meeting of the Oxford Commission. . . . . We had a jolly time, I assur
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
ge Curtis, Sir Edmund Head, Sir C. Lyell, Mr. R. H. Gardiner. letter from Baron Humboldt. letters to Mr. Everett, Hon. E. Twisleton, Sir W. C. Trevelyan. The following letter-which, being chiefly concerned with our national affairs, belongs ratpenny to go to the play or to see a sight, but I owned above six hundred volumes of good books, well bound. To Hon. Edward Twisleton. Boston, January 18, 1859. my dear Twisleton,—I thank you for the correction you have taken the pains to sendTwisleton,—I thank you for the correction you have taken the pains to send me of an error in my History of Spanish Literature, which I immediately entered in the margin of the copy from which I intend speedily to reprint it. I only wish my other friends would be equally observant and kind. Von Raumer sent me one correctieen months, The financial troubles of 1857 had impaired the fortunes of some of the relatives of Mrs. Ticknor and Mrs. Twisleton. the average of content and happiness in the family is, I think, as great as it ever was. As to the country, we go
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
Farrance's, near Eaton Square, which is a most comfortable hotel. On Saturday, December 11, we shall be at Oxford, on our way to the West. Milman is very well; so are the Lyells. I examined Lyell's collection of the flint axe-heads from St. Acheul, in Picardy, contemporaneous with the elephants, etc. Of their human origin there can be no doubt. The evidence of design in their fabrication is as clear as it would be in Paley's watch. Lyell speaks confidently of their geological date. Twisleton and his wife dined at Kent House last night. She is looking peaky from a cold, but otherwise well. Hogarth will resuscitate your print, and I have told him to frame it plainly. There is, I think, a considerable theological movement, since I was last in England, in a rationalistic direction. Kind regards to Mrs. Ticknor and Anna. Yours truly, Edmund Head. To Sir Charles Lyell, Bart. Boston, November 27, 1860. My dear Lyell,—You will be glad, I think, to hear something
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
e warning of coming danger, given by Mr. Prescott's illness in 1858, had not been lost from sight, but there was much to feed the hope that he might still be spared for some years, and Mr. Ticknor said in a letter to Sir Edmund Head, Dated February 21, 1859, Mr. Prescott having died January 27. after his death, The shock to me and to those nearest to him could hardly have been greater if he had been struck down two years ago. A short time afterwards, March 8, 1859. in writing to Mrs. Twisleton, he says: I do not get accustomed to the loss. Indeed, something or other seems to make it fall afresh and heavier almost every day. I go to the house often, of course, and always find Susan in the little upper study where he used to work, with everything just as he left it the moment before he was struck down, . . . . and the whole room crowded and tapestried with associations and memories . . . . . Much sunshine has been taken out of my way of life for the few years that I am to tread
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 24: (search)
Chapter 24: 1867 to 1870. letters to Sir E. Head, Hon. E. Twisleton, Sir Walter Trevelyan, the King of Saxony, G. T. Curtis, General Thayer. Toyours send you affectionate regards. Ever yours, Geo. Ticknor To Hon. Edward Twisleton. Boston, March 22, 1868. my dear Twisleton,—Your sad letter Sir Twisleton,—Your sad letter Sir Edmund Head died very suddenly, of disease of the heart, on the 28th of January, and Mr. Ticknor felt the loss of his friendship deeply. The verses mentioned by Mr.Mr. Twisleton, are, he says, by Bland, of the Greek Anthology, which, among others, Bland wrote in reference to himself, under the impression that he should not live lo never much shared his own apprehensions or those of his friends. To Hon. Edward Twisleton. Boston, April 29, 1869. my dear Twisleton,—Don't give me up becausTwisleton,—Don't give me up because I have grown old. At 77-8 a man does, not what he most likes to do, but what he is able to do; and I am not able to do the half of what I could in a day only a fe
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
Duval Judge, I. 39. Duvergier de Hauranne, II. 131, 186. Dwight, Miss, Anna, I. 398. Dwight, Miss, Catherine, death of, I 456. Dwight, Miss, Ellen. See Twisleton, Hon. Mrs. E. Dyce, Rev. A., II. 181. E Eastlake, Sir, Charles, II. 383, 384. Ebrington, Viscount and Viscountess, L 269, II 371. Eckhardstein, Bager of, II. 54, 55, 90. Tuscany, Grand Duchess of, II. 54, 89, 90. Tuscany, Leopold Grand Duke of, I. 489, II. 49, 50, 51, 53, 54, 315, 339, 340. Twisleton, Hon., Edward, II. 321 and note, 323, 329, 356, 357 364, 365, 366, 370. 373, 376, 378, 379, 387, 397, 429; letters to, 418, 482, 483. Twisleton, Hon Mrs. Edward, II.Twisleton, Hon Mrs. Edward, II. 321 and note. 329, 356, 357. 358, 359, 363, 364, 365, 366, 368, 370, 376, 378, 379, 397, 400, 419, 420, 429, 431 Tyrol, II. 34, 99 Tytler, Patrick Fraser, II. 150. U Ubalpo, Marchese, I. 175. Ugoni, Camillo, II 103, 107. Ullmann, Professor, II. 100. Uncle Tom's Cabin, II 286. V Van Buren, Martin, I. 372, 40