Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 30, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for G. W. H. Tyler or search for G. W. H. Tyler in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

from Governor Pickens.-- Everything was quiet and peaceful. They had heard of the departure of the steamer Brooklyn for the South with United States troops, which caused considerable excitement. The authorities accordingly telegraphed to ex-President Tyler to ascertain the facts, and whether any reinforcements had been sent by Government to Fort Sumter. Ex-President Tyler addressed a note to the President asking him whether reinforcements had been sent to Fort Sumter. The President in his re ex-President Tyler to ascertain the facts, and whether any reinforcements had been sent by Government to Fort Sumter. Ex-President Tyler addressed a note to the President asking him whether reinforcements had been sent to Fort Sumter. The President in his reply said he was not aware that any reinforcements had been sent there. He did not give the ex-President, however, any information respecting the movements of the Brooklyn. The destination of the Brooklyn is supposed to be Fort Pickens.
gress a series of resolutions adopted by the Legislature of Virginia on the 19th inst., having in view a peaceful settlement of the existing questions which now threaten this Union.--They were delivered to me on Thursday, the 24th inst., by Ex-President Tyler, who has left his dignified and honored retirement in the hope that he may render some service to his country in this its hour of need. These resolutions, it will be perceived, extend an invitation to all such States, whether slaveholdve appointed Commissioners to meet those of Virginia, in council. When assembled, they will constitute a body entitled, in an eminent degree, to the confidence of the country. The Federal Assembly of Virginia have also resolved, "That Ex-President Tyler is hereby appointed, by the concurrent vote of each branch of the General Assembly, a Commissioner to the President of the United States, and Judge John Robertson is hereby appointed, by a like vote, a Commissioner to the State of South Car
The Daily Dispatch: January 30, 1861., [Electronic resource], Visit of the Boards of Trade of Milwaukee and Chicago to Washington. (search)
Ex-President Tyler. This aged public servant returned yesterday from Washington city, and is sojourning at the Exchange. Regarded with general respect and veneration as he is, he is looked to with deep interest in his present labor of love in endeavoring to restore peace to his distracted country. But he comes back from the Federal city, we would infer from what we hear, with certainly no increase of hope. If there are really any strong indications of a brighter day to excite hopes in the minds of Messrs. Crittenden, Douglas , and others, they have not been manifested to him, or his joy would be reflected in his own countenance, which was wont so to beam with cheerfulness and benignity. It is plain that his concern for his country is none the less, and that his heart is heavily oppressed with what he has seen and heard.
property of the People of Virginia in and their peace and Tranquility gone away." Have done then, with these arguments about a collision with the Border Free States. If they won't fight a few slave States, will they fill them all combined? And if we remain in the Union, must we not of necessity be hewers of wood and drawers of water to the abolitionist. If they oppressed us in spite of the Cotton States, will they not oppress us the more now that the Cotton States are gone? Mr. Tyler was uncertain last night whether he would go home or not. He evidently thinks the President is not acting in good faith.--Scott has the whip hand of the Administration, and is carrying out his strategic military ideas at Pensacola. There will be fighting there before the Brooklyn arrives, I hear. Then Sumter will be assaulted. So war began. The poor old President is scared out of his sense. He says he fears to veto a force all, lest the Northern people burn him in effigy. Indeed, it
Col. Gilbert C. Russell, one of the earliest settlers of Alabama, but late a resident of Washington city, died in Mobile on the 25th inst. Wm. Shriver was arrested at Memphis, Tenn., on the 25th inst., for a forgery committed at Wheeling, Va. Allen T. Caperton, Esq., and Maj. John Echols are candidates for the Virginia Convention, in Monroe county. Ex-President Tyler has been nominated in New Kent county for the Virginia State Convention. In some parts of Illinois sorghum growing and molasses making have been carried on quite extensively during the past year. The Erie Railroad was sold at New York, Monday, for $220,000. It was bought in by the trustees Robert K. Watkins, a well known merchant of Lynchburg, Va., died on the 26th inst. Ex-Senator Yulee has chartered a schooner on which to return to Florida with his family.