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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: American political writing, 1760-1789 (search)
fires of literary controversy. In May, 1774, the same month that saw the arrival of Gage and the British troops at Boston, Josiah Quincy published at that place his Observations on the Act of Parliament, commonly called the Boston Port-Bill; with thoughts on Civil Society and standing Armies. Quincy was a brilliant young lawyer, who, in company with John Adams, had chivalrously defended the British soldiers indicted for participation in the Boston Massacre, in 1770. A competent critic Tyler, Literary History of the American Revolution, I, 272 note. has suggested that the larger part of the pamphlet, dealing with civil society and standing armies, had been carefully prepared some time before, advantage being taken of the Port Act to publish the work with an expanded title. Quincy's pamphlet was shortly followed by James Wilson's Considerations on the nature and the extent of the legislative authority of the British Parliament, an ingenious rejection of such authority in favour
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
se facile and graceful verse is indicative of English influences all the way from Prior to Cowper. Aside from the lyrics of Freneau, the two original strains in our early lighter verse are the humorous poems of Thomas Green Fessenden and of Royall Tyler, See also Book II, Chaps. II, II, and VI. and the nature lyrics of Alexander Wilson. Fessenden contributed humorous poems of New England country life to Dennie's Farmer's weekly Museum, and these were afterwards published in his Original poems. To this same magazine and also to Dennie's Port Folio, Royall Tyler contributed pictures and studies in verse of American environment and character which are worth all the pretentious imitations of his contemporaries. The lyrics scattered throughout the pages of Alexander Wilson's Ornithology and afterwards printed in his collected poems merit more attention than they have heretofore received. Wilson was scientist and poet enough to celebrate the osprey, the Baltimore bird, the humming
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
play. the closing of the theatres. the Revolutionary satirists. Tyler's contrast. William Dunlap. J. N. Barker. J. H. Payne. beginninthe production in New York on 16 April, 1787, of The contrast by Royall Tyler,the first American comedy to be produced by a professional compa case with Godfrey, the local company served as the inspiration for Tyler. The theme of the play is the contrast between simple native dignianly, who is the prototype of a long succession of stage Yankees. Tyler also wrote a comic opera in two acts, May day in town or New York izoo Purchase. It was played in Boston and New York in 1797. For Tyler, see also Book I, Chap. IX, and Book II, Chaps. in and VI. Important historically as Tyler was, this period is dominated by the personality of William Dunlap, whose first acted play, The father, performof stage development evolved. In our first comedy, The contrast, Tyler developed the stage Yankee in Jonathan, and though J. Robinson's Yo
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: early essayists (search)
ekly Museum at Walpole, New Hampshire, and finally of that notable literary gazette, the Philadelphia Port Folio. Though Dennie collaborated with his friend Royall Tyler in a melange of light prose and verse From the shop of Messrs. Colon & Spondee, which later developed into a series of Author's Evenings reminiscent of men anlay his hand for him, while he could give the devil his due. When I called for the closing paragraph of the sermon, he said, Call again in five minutes. No, said Tyler, I'll write the improvement for you. He accordingly wrote the concluding paragraph, and Dennie never saw it till it was in print. J. T. Buckingham, Specimens of ers who continued to write as an avocation were easily allured into religious or political controversy, for the renown of the Federalist papers was yet new. So Royall Tyler, author of several plays See also Book II, Chap. I. and a series of periodical observations entitled Trash, besides a waggish account of Dennie's first app
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: Irving (search)
guest of Governor Hamilton. The Governor, who had just transmitted to the legislature the edict of nullification, insisted that the author must repeat his visit to the state. Certainly, responded the guest, I will come with the first troops. In 1834, Irving declined a Democratic nomination for Congress, and in 1838 he put to one side the Tammany nomination for mayor of New York and also an offer from President Van Buren to make him Secretary of the Navy. In 1842, he accepted from President Tyler the appointment of Minister to Spain. The suggestion had come to the President from Daniel Webster, at that time Secretary of State. The succeeding five years were in large part devoted to the collection of material relating to the history and the legends of Spain during the Moorish occupation. On his return to New York in 1846, he met with a serious disappointment. His books were out of print, at least in the United States, and his Philadelphia publishers assured him that, as th
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: fiction I — Brown, Cooper. (search)
en producing since 1787, when he had set out to imitate Hudibras. His prose is better than his verse, plain and simple in style, by his own confession following that of Hume, Swift, and Fielding. Swift was his dearest master. Very curious, if hard to follow, are the successive revisions by which Brackenridge kept pace with new follies. Smollett had something to do with another novel which, though less read than Modern Chivalry, deserves mention with it, The Algerine Captive (1797) of Royall Tyler, poet, wit, playwright, and jurist. See also Book I, Chap. IX and Book II, Chaps. II. The first volume has some entertaining though not subtle studies of American manners; the second, a tale of six years captivity in Algiers, belongs with the many books and pamphlets called forth by the war with Tripoli. See also Book II, Chap. III. Historically important is the preface, which declared that the American taste for novels had grown in the past seven years from apathy to a general d
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
, the (Smith), 17, 18 Trumbull, Benjamin, 292 Trumbull, John, 139, 164, 171-173, 174, 233 Tucker, George, 320, 320 n. Tucker, Nathaniel Beverley, 312 Tuckerman, Henry Theodore, 243, 244 Tudor, William, 240 Turell, Jane, 158, 159, 161 Turgot, 91, 106, 147 Twenty considerations against sin, 112 Twenty-six years of the life of an Actor-manager, 221 n. Two Admirals, the, 302 Two years before the mast, 321 Tyler, Pres., John, 250 Tyler, M. C., 135 n. Tyler, Royall, 180, 218-219, 227, 234, 235, 236, 287 Typee, 320, 321 U Uncle Tom's Cabin, 227, 227 n., 307 Under a Mask, 223 Under the Gaslight, 229 Unitarian Christianity, 331 United States magazine, the, 286 Universal beauty, 165 Universal Dictionary, 115 Universal Instructor in all Arts and sciences, etc., 15 Unknown way, the, 271 Unseen Spirits, 280 Untaught Bard, 163 Upside down, 305 V Valla, Laurentius, 68 Van Buren, Martin, 239, 250 Van Doren,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 23: writers of familiar verse (search)
n had advanced beyond its elementary stages. Benjamin Franklin, a pioneer in so many different departments of human endeavour, seems to have been the earliest American to adventure himself among the difficulties of this lighter poetry, so closely akin to prose in its directness and in its seeming lack of effort; and perhaps his lines on Paper could open an American selection of familiar verse only by favouritism. Philip Freneau See Book I, Chap. IX. essayed it more than once; so did Royall Tyler, Ibid. our first writer of comedy; so did John Quincy Adams See Book II, Chap. XV. and James Kirke Paulding See Book II, Chap. V. and Washington Irving, See Book II, Chap. IV.—prose men all of them, dropping into rhyme only occasionally, and only when the spirit moved them. And it is a significant fact, supported by a host of examples in both branches of English literature, British and American, that it is in familiar verse that the expert essayist is most likely to be succe
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
, 402, 405 Trumbull, Benjamin, 106, 108, 111 Trumbull, John, 150, 207 Truth about Horace, the, 241 Tucker, George, 110, 111 Tucker, St. George, 305 Tuckerman, H. T., 58 n. Tudor, William, 105, 164 Tufts College, 207 n. Turn of the Screw, the, 375 Turner, J. A., 348, 349, 350, 354 Tuskegee, 324 Twice told tales, 16, 19, 21, 63, 64, 173 Two Rivulets, the, 265 Two years before the Mast, 225, 399, 400 n. Tyler, President, 93 n. Tyler, Moses Coit, 149 Tyler, Royall, 241 Tyndall, 221 Uhland, 40 Ulalume, 66 Ultima Thule, 40 Uncle of an Angel, 388 Uncle Remus and Brer rabbit, 350 Uncle Remus and his friends, 350 Uncle Remus and the little boy, 350 Uncle Remus: his Songs and his Sayings, 347, 350, 355, 357 n. Uncle Remus's magazine, 350 Uncle Tom's cabin, 47, 168, 352, 401 Under the Lilacs, 402 Under the shade of the trees, 307 Under the Willows, 247 Union (Washington), 183 Union College, 198 Unitari