Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Tyler or search for John Tyler in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
Senator Waggaman intended only to wing his antagonist, and it resulted fatally for him. He missed his aim, but Prieur's bullet was more accurate, striking the senator in the leg and severing the femoral artery. The senator never recovered from the injury. He refused to permit the amputation of his leg, and died of gangrene on March 22, 1843. The duel had occurred on the 20th. Had he lived six months longer he would have been sent as minister to France, for such appears to have been President Tyler's intention. Senator Waggaman's children were: (1) Henry St. John, who became a lawyer and died at an early age; (2) Christine, who married Sanfield McDonald, the first prime minister of Ontario, Canada, and who refused the order of knighthood offered by Queen Victoria; (3) Eugene, the subject of the present sketch; (4) Mathilde, who married Judge Henry D. Ogden; (5) Eliza, who married John R. Conway, and (6) Camille, who died in youth. Eugene Waggaman was educated at Mount St. Ma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
sed against him with telling vengeance. Everywhere the cry rang out in the North against Martin Van Buren's extravagance, and with this cry that of Tippecanoe and Tyler, too, with the result that Harrison was elected. But succeeding years have shown that Mr. Van Buren's administration was the most economical of all the Presidentsce. Among my classmates, said Mr. Semmes, were Rutherford B. Hayes, afterwards President of the United States; Henry C. Semple, nephew of the then President, John Tyler, and Mr. Burlingame, who afterwards became minister to China. While I was at Harvard I read the review of Judge Story's Commentary on the United States Constiough I have often tried to procure it. Judge Upshur was a very excellent scholar and a vigorous writer. He was killed during President Polk's administration, or Mr. Tyler's. The book was loaned to me while at Harvard by my fellow-student, Henry C. Semple, who, by the way, was the father of Rev. Father Semple, president of the Jesu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
runt, Hon., James, 378. Starke, Colonel A. W, 3, 4 Stedman, Charles M., 334. Stewart, Colonel W. H., 77, 285. Stiles, Major, Robert, 39. Strange, Major, James, 135. Streight, Colonel A. D., Capture of, 45. Stribling, Robert M., 67. Sumter, Fort, 131. Sussex Light Dragoons, Roll of, 273. Tabb, Colonel W. B., 3, 17. Taft, A. W, 130. Thomas, Hon. W. M., 222. Tilman, Heroism of Color-Bearer, 345. Tupper, Lieutenant F., killed, 42. Turner, Lieutenant J. M., 41. Tyler, President, John, 321. Tyrrell, Henry, 77. Valley Campaign, Jackson's, 103. Volunteer Soldier, The, 103. Von Browaer, Baron, 181. Waggaman, Colonel, Eugene, 10th Louisiana Infantry, sketch of, 180. Wall, H. C., 151. Wallace, General W. H., 15. Watterson, Henry, 18. Washington, Colonel L. Q., 193. Waterloo, Battle of, 219. Watkins, Major H. C., 5. West Virginia Campaign, 3. Whitaker's Mill captured, 4. White Horse, Incident of the officer on the, 105. Whiting, Gen. W. H.