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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 69 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 9 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for R. C. Tyler or search for R. C. Tyler in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 7 document sections:

lost six killed and eleven wounded. The field-officers of the Forty fourth were Col. S. A. Gilbert, Lieut.-Col. H. Blair Wilson, and Major A. 0. Mitchel, all of whom behaved with great bravery and coolness. No less gallantly moved the Thirty-sixth to the attack of Gen. Heath's right wing. They had to meet the Twenty-second Virginia regiment, an old regiment, organized a year ago in the Kanawha valley, and containing the elite rebels of that region. They had met Gen. Cox at Scarey, Col. Tyler at Cross Lanes, Gen. Rosecrans at Carnifex and at Cotton Hill, and lately, General Cox at Giles Court-House ; and boasted that they had never yet been defeated. The regiment was large, and very confident. After the Thirty-sixth had formed its line of battle, it marched up a steep pitch, almost a ledge; and arriving at the top, where the slope became more gentle, received the fire from the foe, drawn up in line waiting to receive us. The battle at once became general, and the firing was h
t following, by his proclamation, in what States and parts of States insurrection exists: Now, therefore, be it known that I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, do hereby declare and proclaim that the States of South-Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, North-Carolina, and the State of Virginia, except the following counties, Hancock, Brooke, Ohio, Marshall, Wetzel, Marion, Monongalia, Preston, Taylor, Pleasants, Tyler, Ritchie, Doddridge, Harrison, Wood, Jackson, Wirt, Roane, Calhoun, Gilmer, Barbour, Tucker, Lewis, Braxton, Upshur, Randolph, Mason, Putnam, Kanawha, Clay, Nicholas, Cabell, Wayne, Boone, Logan, Wyoming, Webster, Fayette, and Raleigh, are now in insurrection and rebellion, and by reason thereof the civil authority of the United States is obstructed so that the provisions of the Act to provide increased revenue from imports to pay the interest on the public debt, and for other purposes, appr
ery, wishes special mention made of the successful rally by men of the Twenty-first Indiana and three men of the Ninth Connecticut, who, with the assistance of private Tyler, who left his sick-bed and acted as sergeant, gunner, etc., and privates Shield and Clogston, as also Sergeant Cheever, who left the hospital sick to do his duy G, Thirtieth Massachusetts; Third Lieutenant Allyn, Sixth Massachusetts battery; Second Lieutenant Taylor, Fourth Massachusetts battery; Sergeant Cheever and private Tyler, Ninth Connecticut. The following have honorable mention: Lieutenant H. H. Elliott, A. A.A. General to General Williams, for his coolness and intrepidityer, Corp. Wood, and private George Andrews, all of the Sixth Massachusetts battery, for especial bravery, gallantry, and good conduct. Sergeant Cheever and privates Tyler, Shields, and Clogston, of the Ninth Connecticut, for the skill and bravery with which they worked one of the guns of Nim's battery. Captain S. W. Sawyer, of
peper Saturday morning, the eighth inst., and marched a distance of about eight miles, and arrived at the scene of action about two o'clock. We halted in front of the enemy's right, stacked arms and rested about one hour, in the mean time, the artillery had opened fire on both sides, and I think that our artillery opened the fire. We were then ordered, by Gen. Geary, to support a battery which was in position on our centre. On arriving there, our brigade, or rather that part comprising Gen. Tyler's old brigade, (the other part, consisting of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania regiment, had left on the road,) was divided. The Sixty-sixth and Seventh Ohio formed the first line of support; the Fifth and Twenty-ninth Ohio the second, fifty paces in the rear. We were ordered to advance and occupy the line of the Sixty-sixth and Seventh Ohio, while they advanced and gained equal distance in front. We lay there until about six o'clock, having been shelled briskly from the commencement up
peper Saturday morning, the eighth inst., and marched a distance of about eight miles, and arrived at the scene of action about two o'clock. We halted in front of the enemy's right, stacked arms and rested about one hour, in the mean time, the artillery had opened fire on both sides, and I think that our artillery opened the fire. We were then ordered, by Gen. Geary, to support a battery which was in position on our centre. On arriving there, our brigade, or rather that part comprising Gen. Tyler's old brigade, (the other part, consisting of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania regiment, had left on the road,) was divided. The Sixty-sixth and Seventh Ohio formed the first line of support; the Fifth and Twenty-ninth Ohio the second, fifty paces in the rear. We were ordered to advance and occupy the line of the Sixty-sixth and Seventh Ohio, while they advanced and gained equal distance in front. We lay there until about six o'clock, having been shelled briskly from the commencement up
nt, the enemy following slowly but not pressing us. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Braxton Bragg, General Commanding. To Adjutant-General, Richmond, Va. Knoxville Register account. Knoxville, Oct. 18, 1863. Col. R. C. Tyler, of the Fifteenth Tennessee regiment, reached this city yesterday, directly from the scene of conflict in Kentucky. He advises us that the skirmishing commenced on the sixth between the cavalry, and occasionally there was an artillery duel. reach two thousand five hundred. The killed in Cheatham's division number two hundred and nine and about one thousand two hundred and fifty wounded. This division suffered most. At half-past 4 o'clock on Monday morning, thirteenth instant, Col. Tyler left Gen. Polk, and of subsequent events he is of course not advised. Tennesseeans in this fierce conflict maintained their ancient reputation for distinguished valor, not only maintaining it, but winning new and imperishable laurels. The i
estern Waters. Commander Walke's report. gunboat Carondelet, July 15, 1862. sir: In obedience to your orders, passed to me yesterday by acting Fleet-Capt. Phelps, I got under way this morning, accompanied by the gunboat Tyler and steam-ram Queen of the West, and proceeded up the Yazoo on a reconnoissance. We had proceeded about six miles up the river, when we discovered a formidable-looking rebel ram or gunboat, since proved to be the celebrated Arkansas. The Queen of the West, Tyler and Carondelet at once retreated down the river to avoid being inevitably sunk, firing upon her with our stern and occasionally with our side-guns. The enemy vigorously returned the fire from her heavy bow-guns as she pursued, and had greatly the advantage of us from being thoroughly protected by iron. We had continued the fight about one hour when the Arkansas came up, with the evident intention of running us down. I avoided the blow, and as we passed exchanged broadsides at very close q