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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 48 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 40 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 11 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion. You can also browse the collection for Unionists or search for Unionists in all documents.

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White was a thorough Unionist and the leader of a body of thirty to sixty Union Tennesseans, bushwackers, who were the terror of the rebel cavalry in that region. He was welcomed by White's family and remained with them one night, though the rebel cavalry came to the house in search of him, and White's men also called him up, fearing he might be a spy. After stirring up the rebels at one or two points, and again finding shelter for two or three nights among the persecuted East Tennessee Unionists, attending one of their religious meetings where every man was armed, and the services were conducted, like those of the Covenanters three hundred years ago, after night and in the concealment of the forest, lest their enemies should come upon them. In the battle of Chickamauga, as well as in the marches and skirmishes which preceded it, Corporal Pike was actively employed as a scout, and was much of the time in imminent peril, while he rendered excellent service to the Union army. Le
hich they did. This was too much for human nature; and Morford, perceiving that no faith could be placed in the assurances of those in command, determined to be revenged upon them and their cause. His house again became a secret rendezvous for Unionists; and by trusty agents he managed to send regular and valuable information to General Buell-then in command in Tennessee. At length, however, in May, 1862, he was betrayed by one in whom he had placed confidence, and arrested upon the charge ofand bring away the household goods. This was granted, and the wagon brought to McMinnville, whence Morford went to Chattanooga, representing himself along the road as a fugitive from the Yankees. Near Chattanooga he began selling his goods to Unionists and rebels alike, at enormous prices, and soon closed them out at a profit of from four hundred to five hundred dollars. At Chattanooga he remained a few days, obtained all the information he could, and returned to Murfreesboro without trouble
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Part 2: daring enterprises of officers and men. (search)
d killed and wounded, and seven hundred prisoners; the Ninteenth Corps, sixteen hundred killed and wounded, and one hundred prisoners; the Sixth Corps, thirteen hundred killed and wounded; total, three thousand eight hundred. The only reinforcement which the Army of the Shenandoah received, or needed to recover its lost field of battle, camps, intrenchments, and cannon was one man-Sheridan. Refusing to volunteer in the rebel army. In the same prison with Parson Brownlow and other Unionists in Tennessee, was a venerable clergyman, named Cate, and his three sons. One of them, James Madison Cate, a most exemplary and worthy member of the Baptist church, was there for having committed no other crime than that of refusing to volunteer in the rebel army. He lay stretched at full length upon the floor, with one thickness of a piece of carpet under him, and an old overcoat doubled up for a pillow-and he in the agonies of death. His wife came to visit him, bringing her youngest ch
d killed and wounded, and seven hundred prisoners; the Ninteenth Corps, sixteen hundred killed and wounded, and one hundred prisoners; the Sixth Corps, thirteen hundred killed and wounded; total, three thousand eight hundred. The only reinforcement which the Army of the Shenandoah received, or needed to recover its lost field of battle, camps, intrenchments, and cannon was one man-Sheridan. Refusing to volunteer in the rebel army. In the same prison with Parson Brownlow and other Unionists in Tennessee, was a venerable clergyman, named Cate, and his three sons. One of them, James Madison Cate, a most exemplary and worthy member of the Baptist church, was there for having committed no other crime than that of refusing to volunteer in the rebel army. He lay stretched at full length upon the floor, with one thickness of a piece of carpet under him, and an old overcoat doubled up for a pillow-and he in the agonies of death. His wife came to visit him, bringing her youngest ch
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Miss Melvina Stevens, the East Tennessee heroine. (search)
emselves by day to avoid the ruthless conscription, or the murderous violence of the rebels, they had always words of cheer and acts of kindness, feeding them from their own scanty supplies, and sheltering them whenever it was safe to do so. When, as was the case in the later years of the war, the Union prisoners who had escaped from Richmond, Salisbury, Wilmington, Charleston, Millen, and Andersonville, began to find their way over the Black and Cumberland mountain ranges, these faithful Unionists, both men and women, guided and escorted them, concealed them by day or night, and led them by secret routes past the rebel troops which were hunting them, till they were safe within the Union lines. A single guide, Dan Ellis, brought through between four and five thousand escaped prisoners in this way. Among those who assisted actively in this good work was the young and beautiful girl, long known as the nameless heroine, whose services we here record. She was from a loyal family, an
ost without exception loyal. Even Charleston, hotbed of treason as it was, had its loyal league of Union men and women, who, at the peril of liberty and life, performed acts of kindness to Union prisoners confined there, aided them in escaping, and gave them shelter, food, and clothing, till they could get away from the city. Captain W. H. Telford, of the Fiftieth Pennsylvania Volunteers, escaped from Roper Hospital Prison, in Charleston, and was for five weeks concealed by these devoted Unionists. Hie relates an incident which occurred to one of the party who escaped with him, which shows the great peril to which the members of the league sometimes subjected themselves to serve the cause they loved. It should be premised that some of the male members of the league had wives who were very bitter rebels, and some of the ladies who were loyal had husbands who were actively engaged in the rebel cause. The escaped prisoners had remained for several days closely concealed by a trust