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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 48 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 40 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 11 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Unionists or search for Unionists in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
Maryland, and marched about 18 miles, halting near Spotsylvania C. H. June 5, 6, 7 and 8. On the march to Culpeper C. H. Stayed there a day supporting Stuart's Cavalry, while he drove back some raiders near Brandy Station. June 9 to 18. On the road to Maryland. Captured Berryville, Bunker Hill and Martinsburg. Advance into Maryland and Pennsylvania. June 19. Crossed Potomac by wading at Williamsport, Md., and marched through Hagerstown. A majority of the people seem to be Unionists, though there are some delightful exceptions. Bivouacked at Funkstown. Dined at Mr. Syester's, a good Southerner. Gave 75 cents in Confederate money for a pound of stick candy. June 20. Gave $2.12 1/2 for a black hat. With Captain Hewlett and Lieutenant Oscar Smith, of 3d Ala. Called on Misses Mary Jane and Lizzie Kellar, young ladies just from a Pennsylvania Female College, and heard them sing and play Southern songs. June 21. Attended divine services at M. E. Church in Hagerst
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The dismemberment of Virginia. (search)
itory from one State to another, in the act admitting West Virginia, did not include these counties within its limits. In addition to this, and as evidence that Mr. Peirpoint was not sustained in his position even by the most extreme class of Unionists (so-called) With regard to this assumption of the name of Unionists by those whose whole course tended constantly to the destruction of the real Union framed by the founders of the government, the following sentence from Mr. Calhoun's last gUnionists by those whose whole course tended constantly to the destruction of the real Union framed by the founders of the government, the following sentence from Mr. Calhoun's last great speech in the Senate will be found strikingly just and appropriate: But surely, that can with no propriety of language be called a Union, when the only means by which the weaker is held connected with the stronger portion, is force. in Virginia, it should be noted that the convention which met in Alexandria, on the 13th of February, 1864, consisting of, and representing, that class alone, entirely ignored his proclamation announcing the transfer of Berkeley and Jefferson to West Virginia,