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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 48 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 40 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 11 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Unionists or search for Unionists in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
ops a great detour and gain one day's march. He immediately goes to work: the enemy's wagons being promptly repaired, are laden by the inhabitants, most of them Unionists, with boards intended for the construction of a foot-bridge. While one regiment crosses the Tennessee by means of some boats at Hurst Ferry and picks up four ahis men mounted. Blunt, not expecting to find the enemy so near the post, which is concealed from view by an undulation of the ground, takes them at first to be Unionists; he, however, forms his escort for fight, but at the first discharge from the enemy, who advance rapidly, the Federals cowardly disband, abandoning their chief is escort has saved the post. The assailants, badly supported, have been repulsed, and in the evening Quantrell again moves southward, leaving about eighty dead Unionists. He remains on the banks of the Neosho River, in front of which we shall soon again find him. In the mean time, Blunt has been relieved of the command of the
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
appened to be by chance, he ordered Grierson to move his cavalry forward on the enemy's tracks. He could, as we have said, mount scarcely more than two thousand men. The first engagement took place on the 29th of March between a detachment of Unionists and the Neely brigade at the moment when the latter was establishing itself at Bolivar. It repulsed easily the assailants with a loss of twenty wounded and thirty prisoners. The following day Chalmers rejoined Neely in this town, for, informedatter in concert with Admiral Dahlgren. As he made no haste to reply, the President prevailed upon him on January 13th to devote a part of his forces to the re-establishment of the Federal power in Florida, where he believed a goodly number of Unionists to be. Whether it was that his message travelled fast or that Gillmore anticipated the President's desires, he wrote to him on the 14th a proposition for an expedition into the interior of Florida. With every latitude allowed him to direct and