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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 20 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
ization and come-outerism were twin brothers; protests, both, against pro-slavery clerical and ecclesiastical despotism. But the ranks of the disorganizers were swelled by the followers of Channing, whose dread of Lib. 15.29; ante, 2.56. organization was most acute, and belief in the superiority of individual to associated action almost fatuous; His flatterers pretended that the abolition societies had cost him the public ear on the subject of slavery. Dr. Channing himself, said the Unitarian Monthly Miscellany, has not a tithe of the influence he would have had, had there been no organization. Protest as he may, he will be identified with the organized mass (Lib. 11: 69). Mrs. Child, on the contrary, asserted in the Standard that Channing had intended to preach a sermon on slavery after his return from the West Indies (ante, 1: 466), but never did, and only broke silence after he had caught the glow of associated anti-slavery action (Lib. 11: 93). and especially by the Transc
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
elcomed him Lib. 16.146. anew to Muswell Hill, and there made him acquainted Ante, 2.377. with W. J. Fox, the eminent Unitarian preacher, and Lib. 16:[155]. with the exiled Mazzini. He came to know and to esteem Lib. 18.61. William Lovett and H; Lib. 16.206. visit was that with Mary Carpenter, the philanthropic daughter of the Rev. Lant Carpenter, famous in English Unitarian annals. To mingle much with this denomination abroad was a novel experience for Mr. Garrison. On September 10, 18.): I am under great obligations to Francis Bishop, William James, H. Solly, Philip Carpenter, George Harris, and other Unitarian clergymen, and have formed for them a strong personal friendship, which they appear heartily to reciprocate. By a lett was the ex-Methodist Rev. Joseph Barker, whom Mr. Garrison had just visited expressly at Leeds, at the instance of his Unitarian friends—Mr. Barker having recently gone Ms. Sept. 10, 1846, W. L. G. to H. E. G. over to that body, to the great scand
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
h the greatest fidelity and self-abnegation, to the close of the anti-slavery struggle, to which no one brought richer gifts of integrity, humanity, culture—inherited and personal. I was, he wrote to Miss Carpenter, July 15, 1851, a birthright Unitarian—grew up to think their ministers faultless men, almost—honest and fearless seekers for the truth and the right. I was for many years their fellow-laborer, admirer, and defender,— and devoted to the Unitarian cause. My eyes opened very slowly to the defection and decline of the early Unitarian spirit. Many preceded me in their witness against the bigotry, narrowness, and worldliness which crept into and subjected the Unitarian body—till now, in its organized movement at least, it has become what I have already expressed [a lifeless, soulless thing ]. It was with a great price—at a great sacrifice of feeling, ease, and social consideration (I may say this to you, which I would not wish to dwell upon at all)—that I purchased m
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
t reformatory spirits; but Mr. May could not yield entire sympathy or allow his name to be appended. I am sorry, he responded on January Ms. to W. L. G. 15, 1848, you are going to have a Convention, because it will help rather than hinder the project of the Sabbatarians. Opposition will give importance to their doings. He thought the Sabbath laws were a dead-letter. Theodore Parker, however, as in the time of the Ante, 2.422-426. ChardonStreet Convention, was less disturbed than his Unitarian brother: Theodore Parker to W. L. Garrison. Boston, Jan. 9, 1848. Ms. My dear Sir: I heartily subscribe my name to the Call for the Convention which you speak of. But I don't think I shall be able to take any prominent part in the discussions at that Convention. Still, I will do what I can. Sometimes I have thought that hitherto, amid the fierce this-worldliness of N. E., nothing New England. but superstition would keep [the people] (in their present low state) from perverti
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
e proceedings, it would have been wretchedly out of place. As it was, my speech fitted in almost as well as if it had been impromptu, although a sharp eye might easily have discovered that I was speaking memoriter. Rynders interrupted me again and again, exclaiming that I lied, that I was personal; but he ended with applauding me! No greater contrast to what was to follow could possibly be imagined than the genial manner, firm tones, and selfpossession, the refined discourse, of this Unitarian clergyman, who was felt to have turned the current of the Nat. A. S. Standard, 10.199. meeting. Up rose, as per agreement, one Professor Grant, a seedy-looking personage, having one hand tied round with a dirty cotton cloth. Mr. Garrison recognized 50th Anniversary of a Pastorate, p. 31. him as a former pressman in the Liberator office. His thesis was that the blacks were not men, but belonged to the monkey tribe. His speech proved dull and tiresome, and was made sport of by his own s
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
t that I am sadly ashamed of many things which I send out simply because I have not strength to copy them. Harriet Beecher Stowe to W. L. Garrison. [Andover], Cabin, December 12, 1853. Ms. On one point I confess myself to be puzzled. Why are Wright, etc., so sensitive to the use of the term infidel? If Henry C. Wright. I understand H. Wright's letters in the Liberator, he openly professes to be what is called commonly an infidel. Names are given for conveniencea sake—such as Unitarian, Baptist, Universalist, Infidel. They mark the belief of the individual. If H. Wright is not an infidel, what is he? I inquire honestly, for if anybody had asked me if he was one, I should have answered yes without a moment's hesitation, in the same manner as I should have said that May was a Unitarian. . . . S. J. May. I find the following numbers missing from the Liberator of this year, and should like to have them sent me: 27, 28, 29, 30, 39, 41, 49. Harriet Beecher Stowe to