Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Abel P. Upshur or search for Abel P. Upshur in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
seph Kinnear, Robert Sterret, Alexander Stuart. The following died in prison: H. W. Patterson, Cyrus Patterson, John Henry Mackey, Gideon Marks, William Brownlee, William Black. Wesley Paxton was drowned in the Kanawha river in 1862. The 14th Virginia Regiment was in Jenkins', afterwards McCausland's, Brigade, and did service in West Virginia, the Shenandoah Valley, and around Richmond. It was composed of three companies from Greenbrier, one from Augusta, one from Charlotte, one from Upshur, one from Rockbridge, and a large portion of two others were from this county (Captain William A. Lackey's and Alexander M. Peck's), the remainder of these two companies being from Roanoke, Pulaski, Montgomery and Highland counties. It was among the best mounted regiments in the service, and the discipline and their soldierly bearing were noticeable. James Cochran, of Augusta county, was Colonel; John A. Gibson, of Rockbridge, Lieutenant-Colonel; B. F. Eakle, of the Greenbrier White Sulph
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
ch assumes that for an intellectual growth a man should be born and reared in a city or a closely settled neighborhood—a hothouse, so to speak, in which his brain and energies are to be stimulated to the highest degree. But history gives little warrant for such an assumption. The great men of this country certainly were nearly all of them country bred. Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Calhoun, Patrick Henry, John Marshall, George Mason, John Randolph, Henry Clay, Henry A. Wise, Abel P. Upshur, William C. Rives, Silas Wright, Thomas H. Benton, Andrew Jackson, Francis P. Blair, Abraham Lincoln, William J. Bryan, and many more I could adduce were the product of country life—of plantation life—and almost without exception had not only the plantation manners, in which dignity and good breeding were happily blended, but possessed also the genius and force in affairs which plantation life and duties and contact with Nature rather than with the mob tended to develop. You do not find<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
, who afterwards became minister to China. While I was at Harvard I read the review of Judge Story's Commentary on the United States Constitution, written by Judge Upshur, of Virginia. This book was the turning point in my political thought. Reflecting seriously on its spirit and teachings, I became a Democrat, and never once and father were bitterly opposed, but my conversion rested upon firm conviction in the undying principles of true Democracy. It was a remarkable book, that of Judge Upshur's review. I have never seen the work since, though I have often tried to procure it. Judge Upshur was a very excellent scholar and a vigorous writer. He was Judge Upshur was a very excellent scholar and a vigorous writer. He was killed during President Polk's administration, or Mr. Tyler's. The book was loaned to me while at Harvard by my fellow-student, Henry C. Semple, who, by the way, was the father of Rev. Father Semple, president of the Jesuit's College of this city. Henry C. Semple afterwards became a distinguished lawyer of Montgomery, Alabama.