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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 21 3 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 13 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 12 6 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 8 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 3 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 5 1 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), How Jefferson Davis was overtaken. (search)
soldiers, Winslow and Noble, led by the intrepid General Upton, under the cover of darkness, broken only by themight come in contact. On the 28th of April, General Upton was ordered, with a detachment of his division, General A. J. Alexander, with the Second Brigade of Upton's Division, was directed by General Winslow to scoutxcellent and spirited officer. In the meantime, General Upton, at Augusta, had sent me a dispatch advising me ition of our forces may be described as follows: General Upton, with parts of two regiments, occupied Augusta, servation. General Winslow, with the larger part of Upton's Division, occupied Atlanta, and scouted the countro engaged in watching the Ocmulgee from the right of Upton's Division to Macon, and in scouting the country to ce President of the Confederacy, was arrested by General Upton, at Crawfordsville, about the same time, and alsthe desire that they might be spared that pain. General Upton was charged with making the necessary arrangemen
ur pursuit; the strong forces occupying the works near Georgetown, Arlington and Alexandria; the certainty, too, that General Patterson, if needed, would reach Washington with his army of more than 30,000, sooner than we could; and the condition and inadequate means of the army in ammunition, provision and transportation, prevented any serious thoughts of advancing against the Capital. To the second question, I reply, that it has never been feasible for the army to advance further than it has done — to the line of Fairfax Courthouse, with its advanced posts at Upton's, Munson's and Mason's Hills. After a conference at Fairfax Courthouse with the three senior General officers, you announced it to be impracticable to give this army the strength which those officers considered necessary to enable it to assume the offensive. Upon which, I drew it back to its present position. Most respectfully your obedient servant, J. E. Johnston. A true copy: G. W. C. Lee, Col. and A. D. C
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 13: campaign in Virginia.-Bristol Station.-mine Run.-Wilderness. (search)
ls Penn and Godwin, with four pieces of artillery. Daylight was fast disappearing; Russell's division of the Sixth Corps was in line of battle in its front, with Upton's brigade deployed as skirmishers. Russell thought he could carry the work, so Sedgwick gave the order. The conditions were favorable to success; the wind blowinfour, and so rapid was the Federal rush that only six were killed and thirty-nine wounded; eight captured flags were carried to Meade's headquarters by Russell and Upton, preceded by a band, and then sent in charge of Russell to the War Department at Washington, after the manner Napoleon's trophies went sometimes to Paris, but the while others had to be cleared of dead bodies. The lips of the dead were incrusted with powder from biting cartridges. It was a horrible scene. Two days before Upton's brigade of the Sixth Corps broke through the Confederate lines. General Lee was very sensitive about his lines being broken. It made him more than ever persona
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
dd's Tavern, Va., 244. Toombs, General, Robert, 213, 214. Torbert's cavalry division, 343. Totopatomoy Creek, 158. Traveler, Lee's favorite horse, 211, 312, 406. Trevilian's, cavalry fight at, 344. Trimble, General, at Gettysburg, 287. Trist, Nicholas P., commissioner 46. Tucker's, Commodore, naval battalion, 381. Tunstall's Station, Va., 154. Turenne, Field-Marshal, 13, 423. Turner's Gap, Va., 205, 206. Twiggs, General David E., 38, 40. United States Ford, 245. Upton's brigade, 319. Valley of Virginia, 104, 107. Van Buren, Martin, 32. Van Dorn, General, 133. Venable, Colonel, 277. Vendome, Marshal, defeated, 288. Vera Cruz, siege of, 33, 35, 36, 37. Verdiersville, 330. Vidaun, General, 62. Vicksburg, surrender of, 305. Vincent, General, killed at Gettysburg, 302. Virginia Convention, 87. Virginia Military Institute, 414. Virginians and Georgians, 336. Volunteer officers, 24. Wadsworth, General, mentioned, 137, 277, 2
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 13: responsibility for the failure to pursue. (search)
d Alexandria; the certainty, too, that General Patterson, if needed, would reach Washington with his army of more than thirty thousand sooner than we could; and the condition and inadequate means of the army in ammunition, provisions, and transportation, prevented any serious thought of advancing upon the Capitol. To the second question I reply that it has never been feasible for the army to advance farther than it has done — to the line of Fairfax Court-House, with its advanced posts at Upton's, Munson's, and Mason's Hill. After a conference at Fairfax Court-House with the three senior general officers, you announced it to be impracticable to give this army the strength which those officers considered necessary to enable it to assume the offensive. Upon which I drew it back to its present position. Most respectfully, your obedient servant, J. E. Johnston. This answer to my inquiry was conclusive as to the charge which had been industriously circulated, that I had prevent
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 45: exchange of prisoners and Andersonville. (search)
t down on the snow. This command was complied with, and if perchance some shivering prisoner had involuntarily pushed his shirt or blanket between himself and the dampness beneath, a detail was sent down the line in the rear and rudely snatched every remnant of clothing from beneath, so that there we sat with absolutely nothing intervening between us and the snow. These manceuvres were something new in military tactics, and doubtless never entered the brain of such sluggards as Hardee and Upton. How long we sat there, I do not know; seconds seemed hours, minutes days. The outrage was reported to Colonel Sweet, the commandant, but no notice was taken of it. For the highest type of loyalty, that unselfish, generous, cheerful, unspotted kind, commend me to the Confederate prisoner of war, who for long months patiently endured the punishment and indignities heaped upon him by his inferiors. Day after day suffering the pangs of hunger. All this, and the privilege waiting him of
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 64: capture of President Davis, as written by himself. (search)
the crossing of the Savannah River. During the night after my arrival in Washington he sent in an application for authority to draw from the treasure, under the protection of the troops, enough to make to them a partial payment. I authorized the acting Secretary of the Treasury to meet the requisition by the use of the silver coin in the train. When the next day passed without the troops coming forward, I wrote to the Secretary of War to deprecate longer delay, having heard that General Upton had passed within a few miles of the town, on his way to Augusta to receive the surrender of the garrison and military material at that place, in conformity with orders issued by General Johnston. This was my first positive information of his surrender. Not receiving an immediate reply to the note addressed to General Breckinridge, I explained to Captain Campbell, of Kentucky, commanding my escort, that his company was not strong enough to fight, and too large to pass without observatio
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
de, which was accompanied by a battery of six 12-pounder boat howitzers, brought from the naval launches, and commanded by Midshipman B. F. Porter. The brigades of Reno and Parke followed. The road being swampy and fringed with woods, the march was slow and cautious. The first pickets encountered fired their pieces and ran for their lives. Foster pressed on, and soon coming in sight of the Confederate works, he disposed his troops for action by placing the Twenty-fifth Massachusetts, Colonel Upton, in line, with the Twenty-third Massachusetts, Colonel Kurtz, for a support. With musketry and cannon he opened the battle, and was hotly answered by musketry and cannon. The fight was severe, and soon the Twenty-seventh Massachusetts, Colonel Lee, came to the aid of their fellow New Englanders, by falling upon the sharpshooters in the woods, on the left of the Confederate line. To relieve the Twenty-third Massachusetts, the Tenth Connecticut, Colonel Russell, came up to the support o
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
up the main country road to attack Fort Thompson and the Confederate left. Reno, with the second brigade, followed nearer the line of the railway, to fall upon their right; and Parke, with the third brigade, kept such position that he might attack their front or assist the other two brigades. Foster began battle at eight o'clock. His troops consisted of the Twenty-third, Twenty-fourth, Twenty-fifth, and Twenty-seventh Massachusetts, commanded respectively by Colonels Kurtz, Stevenson, Upton, and Lee; and the Tenth Connecticut, Colonel Drake. At the same time Reno pushed on toward the Confederate right flank, while Parke took position on their front. Foster was supported on his left by the boat-howitzers, manned by Lieutenants McCook, Hammond, Daniels, and Tillotson, with marines and a detachment of the Union Coast Guard. Before the Confederate center was placed a 12-pounder steel cannon, under Captain Bennett, of the Cossack, who was assisted in its management by twenty of th
put my troops in motion, and, in accordance with instructions from General Longstreet, formed his advanced guard in the direction of Manassas. I placed Lieutenant Colonel Upton, of the Fifth Texas, in command of about one hundred and fifty picked men, from the Texas brigade, to act as skirmishers, and instructed him to rapidly pard one of those military feats which is entitled to the admiration of every soldier. Although the Federals opposed us with the different arms of the service, Colonel Upton drove them before him with such rapidity that General Longstreet sent me orders, two or three times, to halt, since the Army was unable to keep within supportinders, as they arrived upon the field, when the Fifth Texas--after Colonel Robertson had been wounded in the faithful discharge of his duty, and the gallant, noble Upton had been killed--slipped the bridle and rushed forward, breaking loose from its brigade. When night approached, and the battle was over, I found it far to the fro
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