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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 21 3 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 13 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 12 6 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 8 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 3 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 17, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Upton or search for Upton in all documents.

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le and stretched our arms upon Brandymore Castle, near the Alexandria, Loudoun and Hampshire railroad. The eagerness and anxiety of our soldiers here to see the Yankee Capital surpassed all bounds. It was almost impossible for the military authorities to keep their men in camp. The nearest point from which a view of Washington could be had was from Upton's Hill, a place of much interest, as it is owned by the present Black-Republican Congressman from the disloyal portion of Virginia.--Upton's residence is pierced by two cannon balls, fired into it by the Washington Artillery, when they drove the enemy off the hill some ten days ago. The writer of this article, as he now stands upon this lofty eminence and facing the Potomac, can see the stupendous dome of the Federal Capitol far beyond and overlooking Arlington Heights. The colors of the stars and stripes floating droopingly over the doomed city, contrasts finely with the deep blueish green of the forests of the Maryland Heigh