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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
urther attempt, leaving that part of the field in charge of a staff-officer with authority to act in his name, and going farther to the right to find that General Johnston was dead. However, having previously learned, from his aide-de-camp, Colonel Urquhart, that Adjutant-General Jordan was near by, he requested that officer, through Colonel Urquhart, to collect and employ some of our troops to turn the left of the position that obstructed his advance toward the river, as just described. Upon Colonel Urquhart, to collect and employ some of our troops to turn the left of the position that obstructed his advance toward the river, as just described. Upon that service Colonel Jordan, in a few moments, employed Statham's brigade, which was fortunately found near by, resting at ordered arms, General Breckinridge, to whom the order was given, being with it at the time. This happened, be it noted, at 2:30 P. M., or about the moment that General Johnston was bleeding to death in the covert of a deep ravine a very short distance from Statham's brigade, in the immediate rear of which it was that his wound had been inflicted. General Johnston was not
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Notes of a Confederate staff-officer at Shiloh. (search)
had with me the chiefs-of-staff of Polk, Bragg, and Hardee, Colonel David Urquhart, the chief aide-de-camp of Bragg, and Colonel William Prestfiring, and to keep the batteries advancing. Colonels Preston and Urquhart remained with me the longer time and assisted greatly. Finally, however, Urquhart, learning from some of the troops encountered that he was in proximity to his chief, General Bragg, left me to join him, whi of it were to be seen a brigade of Confederate troops at a halt. Urquhart now galloped up and informed me that General Bragg had sent him tobstructed his advance. I at once pushed across a deep ravine with Urquhart and Preston to the troops in view, which proved to be Statham's brn and take those batteries, pointing in the direction indicated by Urquhart, and where was to be heard the din of their discharges. As the orking man I ever had seen. I then. turned, accompanied both by Urquhart and Preston, with the purpose of going to the camp and battery pre
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
Bragg's advance and retreat. see also articles by General Wheeler and General Buell, pp. 1 and 32. by David Urquhart, Colonel, C. S. A.; member of General Bragg's staff. General Bragg's Kentucky campaign has drawn on him more criticism than any other part of his career as a military commander. During that memorable march I rode at his side from day to day, and it was his habit to confide to me his hopes and fears. About the end of June, 1862, General Bragg was visited by many prominent citizens of Kentucky, who had abandoned their homes, and who assured him that Kentuckians were thoroughly loyal to the South, and that as soon as they were given an opportunity it would be proven. Fired with this idea, he planned his offensive campaign. On the 21st of July, 1862, the movement of the Army of Mississippi from Tupelo was ordered. The infantry moved by rail, the artillery and cavalry across the country. Headquarters were established at Chattanooga on the 29th. On the 30th Ma
in position at once. General Bragg will give you further orders. Your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard. (Similar orders to Major-General Polk.) headquarters Army of the Mississippi, May 18, 1862--3 p. m. Maj. Gen. John C. Breckinridge: General: The general commanding has information that the enemy are forming line of battle in front of General Van Dorn. He directs you to form your troops and take your position and await orders. By command of General Braxton Bragg: David Urquhart, Aide-de-Camp. (Similar orders to Major-General Polk.) headquarters Army of the Mississippi, Corinth, Miss., May 18, 1862. Major-General Polk: General: The general commanding directs that the troops be permitted to return to their encampments and get their breakfasts, but to be held ready to move at a moment's notice. Respectfully, general, your obedient servant, P. H. Thomson, Assistant Adjutant-General. General Beauregard's headquarters, May 18, 1862. General Van Dorn
auregard, on the morning of the 3d of April, 1862, to General A. S. Johnston, who accepted the same without modification in a single particular. Thomas Jordan, Brig.-Gen. and A. A. G. The following passage is taken from a statement of Colonel D. Urquhart, of General Bragg's staff, addressed to General Jordan. It confirms, as the reader will see, all that precedes: Narragansett, R. I., August 25th, 1880. My dear General,—I am in receipt of your letter of—, and in reply have to saff, he should issue all orders without the formula of being submitted and approved by General Johnston, except, of course, such an order as that of directing the offensive. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Yours truly, David Urquhart. To General Thomas Jordan, New York. At the hour prescribed in the preparatory circular to the corps commanders, which had been sent out that morning—viz., about ten o'clock—the troops were all under arms in Corinth, apparently ready fo
r, 13th Iowa, commanding brigade, in his Report, says (Record of the Rebellion, vol. IV. p. 379): The fire of the enemy's guns ceased at dark, and during the night we remained under arms in that position. Extract of a letter from Colonel David Urquhart, of General Bragg's staff, to General Thomas Jordan, late A. A. G. Of the united Confederate forces at and around Corinth. Narragansett, R. I., August 25th, 1880. Dear General,—* * * * * * During the first day of the battle ofombined armies, up to the moment in the afternoon when it was withdrawn, carrying off so considerable a part of the enemy's captured artillery, and in such good order that Buell's and Grant's armies did not venture to follow. Yours truly, David Urquhart. To Genl. Thomas Jordan, New York. For Genl. G. T. Beauregard, New Orleans, La. Thomas Jordan. Appendix to Chapter XXIII. Telegram. Jackson, Tenn., Feb. 21st, 1862. General L. Polk, Columbus: Can you spare General McCown
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
d of truth, said he; I will give you leave to call me idiot, if there is a word of truth. You know he was ambassador at the court of St. Petersburg for a long time. He said that Russia was full of friendly regard for England; and he pronounced Urquhart, David Urquhart, 1805-1877; M. P. for Stafford in 1847. who is now going about the kingdom preaching against Russia, a madman. With regard to Lockhart, he expressed himself in terms not less distinct. He said that he had never seen him; butDavid Urquhart, 1805-1877; M. P. for Stafford in 1847. who is now going about the kingdom preaching against Russia, a madman. With regard to Lockhart, he expressed himself in terms not less distinct. He said that he had never seen him; but, from all that he had heard of him, he thought him one of the greatest blackguards in England. I happened to tell a story that I had heard from Lord Brougham: he looked me in the eye, and asked my authority for it. I replied: Lord Brougham; I had it from his own lips.—Did you ever verify it? was the short but significant reply. I have selected these little things, because they at once reveal in a few words his opinions with regard to some distinguished persons, and illustrate his frankness.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, London, Jan. 12. (search)
d of truth, said he; I will give you leave to call me idiot, if there is a word of truth. You know he was ambassador at the court of St. Petersburg for a long time. He said that Russia was full of friendly regard for England; and he pronounced Urquhart, David Urquhart, 1805-1877; M. P. for Stafford in 1847. who is now going about the kingdom preaching against Russia, a madman. With regard to Lockhart, he expressed himself in terms not less distinct. He said that he had never seen him; butDavid Urquhart, 1805-1877; M. P. for Stafford in 1847. who is now going about the kingdom preaching against Russia, a madman. With regard to Lockhart, he expressed himself in terms not less distinct. He said that he had never seen him; but, from all that he had heard of him, he thought him one of the greatest blackguards in England. I happened to tell a story that I had heard from Lord Brougham: he looked me in the eye, and asked my authority for it. I replied: Lord Brougham; I had it from his own lips.—Did you ever verify it? was the short but significant reply. I have selected these little things, because they at once reveal in a few words his opinions with regard to some distinguished persons, and illustrate his frankness.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XXV (search)
y, as in all countries, who assume a clean shirt but once a week, probably did little or no good to the offending individuals, while it has winged a fatal arrow for Matthew Arnold's bow, as for many others. Comparisons are often misleading. David Urquhart, the English traveller, was always denouncing his fellow-countrymen as exceedingly dirty when compared with the Mohammedan races, and used to wish that Charles Martel had not finally driven back the Saracen forces at the battle of Tours, because if he had been defeated, Urquhart says, the Mohammedans would have overrun all Europe, and then even we English should have been gentlemen. Of all the points on which we Americans are apt to satirize ourselves, the much-discussed American girl is the most available. There is not in this wide land a journalist so callow as not to be able, when news runs short, to turn a paragraph on this theme, with some epigram as sparkling as his brains and as comprehensive as his experience. Thus, op
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, Index (search)
son, Maurice, 67. Thoreau, H. D., VI., 9, 16, 73, 90, 114, 155, 175, 220. Ticknor, George, 19. Tocqueville, A. C. H. de, 32, 121. Tolstoi, Count, Leo, 35. Tonics, literary, 62. Touchstone quoted, 21. Tourgueneff, Ivan, 219. Town and gown, 161. Tracy, Uriah, 46. Transcendental school, the, 8. Translators, American, 144. Travers, W. R., 82. Trench, R. C., 57. Trollope, Frances, 24. Tupper, M. F., 98. Twain, Mark, see Clemens. Tyndall, John, 22. U, V. Urquhart, David, 208, 209. Vestris, M., 83. Virgil, 99, 171, 217. Voltaire, F. M. A. de, 52, 53, 83, 187, 189 Von Holst, H. E., 32. W. Wagner, Richard, 16. Wallace, H. B., 51. Wallace, Lew, 67. Walpole, Horace, 135, 210. Walton, Izaak, 202. Walworth, M. T., 198, 200. Ward, Artemus, 59. Warner, C. D., 2. 72. Washington, George, 112, 155. Wasson, D. A., v., 103. Weapons of precision, 192. Webb, R. D., 29. Webster, Daniel, 155, 224. Weiss, John, 104. Weller, Sam, 182. West
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