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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
regiment may be said to have had a really good time, as did the entire brigade. So at the opening of the campaign in 1864, the regiment and entire brigade appeared well recruited for duty, well equipped and in good fighting trim generally. Governor Vance, in a speech to the army, said the boys looked like they had corn to sell. This remark of Governor Vance's suggested most strikingly the contrast as between the appearance of the troops then and their woebegone plight on the return from the Governor Vance's suggested most strikingly the contrast as between the appearance of the troops then and their woebegone plight on the return from the fatal field of Gettysburg. It was somewhat now like it was when the fight first opened at Chancellorsville, barring the fact that the regiment did not number so many men. It entered the fight at Chancellorsville in first-rate trim, numbering somewhere between 300 and 400 men, rank and file. It lost good officers there in the death of Captains Knight, of Co. D, and Hedspeth, of Co. K, besides from fifty to sixty privates and two commissioned officers killed and from 125 to 150 wounded, as estim