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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for A. D. Vance or search for A. D. Vance in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 9: the Red River expedition. (search)
t-balls filled the air with that strange, file-rasping sound that war has made familiar to our fighting men. The teams were abandoned by the drivers, the traces cut, and the animals ridden off by the frightened men. Bareheaded riders rode with agony pictured in their faces, and for at least ten minutes it seemed as if we were going to destruction together. --Correspondent of the Philadelphia Press. Generals Franklin and Ransom, and Colonel Robinson of the Third Cavalry, were wounded, and Colonel Vance, of the Ninety-sixth Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Webb, of the Seventy-seventh Ohio, and Captain Dickey, of General Ransom's staff, were killed. So ended, in disaster to the Union arms, the battle of Sabine cross Roads. Fortunately for the shattered columns of Franklin's advance, General W. H. Emory was then approaching rapidly with his fine division. He had been advised of the condition of affairs at the front, and was directed to form a line of battle in the strongest position he coul
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 17: Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--the capture of Fort Fisher. (search)
river or bay steamer), the flag-ship; New Ironsides, Brooklyn, Mohican, Tacony, Kansas, Unadilla, Huron, Pequot, Yantic, Maumee, Pawtuxet, Pontoosuc, Nyack. Ticonderoga, Shenandoah, Juniata, Powhatan, Susquehanna, Wabash, Colorado, Minnesota, Vanderbilt, Mackinaw, Tuscarora, Vicksburg, St. Jago de Cuba, Fort Jackson, Osceola, Sassacus, Chippewa, Maratanza, R. R. Cuyler, Rhode Island, Monticello, Alabama, Montgomery, Keystone State, Queen City, Iosco, Aries, Howquah, Wilderness, Cherokee, A. D. Vance, Moccasin, Eolus, Gettysburg, Emma, Lillian, Nansemond, Tristram Shandy, Britannia, Governor Buckingham, Saugus, Monadnock, Canonicus, Mahopac. Total, 58. The last four were monitors. On the evening of the 15th, the transports, with the troops, arrived at the prescribed rendezvous, about twenty-five miles at sea, east of Fort Fisher. The ocean was perfectly calm, and remained so for three days, while the army was anxiously waiting for the navy; for the landing of troops could have b
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
ible, in heavy rain, taking formal possession of deserted Raleigh on his way. When the Commissioners, appointed by Governor Vance (see note 8, below) to carry a message to General Sherman, returned, as they approached Raleigh, they saw the railwayion house. The Commissioners found a single servant in the Governor's room at the State-House, who had been intrusted by Vance with the keys, to deliver them. Vance had also left with the Mayor, W. B. Harrison, authority to surrender the city to SVance had also left with the Mayor, W. B. Harrison, authority to surrender the city to Sherman, in the form of a letter to the General, begging him to extend the favor of his protection to the citizens, the charitable institutions, and the precious documents and other property in the State Capitol. President Swain alone was at the Staose of effecting an adjustment of the quarrel with the United States. These two gentlemen held a consultation with Governor Vance, at Raleigh. April 9. The result was their appointment as commissioners, to carry to General Sherman a communication