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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 11 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for John Vaughan or search for John Vaughan in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Life of George Ticknor. (search)
It was a larger city than I had ever seen; it seemed to me very large, though it then contained only a fifth of its present population. We stayed there till after the 1st of January, and witnessed and shared that high holiday of Dutch origin, but at that time of almost universal observance. The house I most frequented was that of Mr. Robert Lenox, a rich Scotch merchant, intelligent, hearty, and hospitable, with a very agreeable family. We went to Philadelphia the 2d, and there Mr. John Vaughan, the Secretary of the Philosophical Society, took charge of me, and made me acquainted with every one whom I could desire to know. I was a great deal at the house of Mr. William Meredith, a lawyer held in much respect; but his wife (of the Morris family in New York) was so uncommon for talent, knowledge, and brilliant conversation, that he was rather overshadowed at home. She educated her large family herself, entirely fitting her sons for college. She was a lady of warm feelings, st
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
sent our letters of introduction. Journal. May 30.—To-day I dined at Mr. William Vaughan's, the brother of Mr. Benjamin Vaughan, of Hallowell, and of Mr. John Vaughan, of Philadelphia, and as actively kind and benevolent as either of them. Dr. Rees, the editor of the Cyclopaedia, was there, and, though now past seventy, aions of his wife, by living so much of his time—at considerable expense—in London, that he might be near his subject and in good society. June 6.—We dined at Mr. Vaughan's with several men of letters, but I saw little of them, excepting Mr. Sharp, formerly a Member of Parliament, and who, from his talents in society, has been ca manner is gracious and elegant; and, though I should not think of comparing her to Corinne, yet I think she has uncommon powers. . . . June 16.—We dined at Mr. Vaughan's, with Dr. Schwabe, a learned German clergyman, who gave us considerable information on the state of letters in Germany; Mr. Maltby, the successor of Porson
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
in discovering and assisting two German refugees, scholarly men, who had fled, for political reasons, first to Switzerland, and thence to the United States, and who had written to him asking aid in finding employment. Their names were Beck and Follen, and it was supposed they might be found or heard of in Philadelphia. On his way home, therefore, Mr. Ticknor took great pains to gain some knowledge of them in Philadelphia, but failed up to the last day of his stay there. On that day, Mr. John Vaughan Brother of Mr. Benjamin and Mr. William Vaughan; see ante, p. 55. dined with him at the hotel, and, being interested in the search, suggested, as a last resource, that a Swiss shopkeeper in the neighborhood might possibly furnish some information. This chance was tried successfully. Two modest young men were found, just preparing, in despair of better things, to go as tillers of the soil into the interior of Pennsylvania. Mr. Ticknor said to them, You must furnish me with a writ
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
d note. Tuscany, Leopold Grand Duke of, 489. U Ubaldo, Marchese, 175. V Van Buren, Martin, 372, 409. Van Rensselaer, General, 381. Varnhagen Von Ense 495. Vathek. See Beckford. Vaughan, Benjamin, 55, 352 note, 413. Vaughan, John, 15, 55, 352. Vaughan, Mr., 209, 372 and note, 381, 382. Vaughan, William, 55, 58, 263, 352 note, 413. Venice, visits, 162-166. Verplanck, Mr., 381. Victoria, Princess, 435, 437. Vignolles, Rev. Mr., 424. Villafranca, Marques dVaughan, Mr., 209, 372 and note, 381, 382. Vaughan, William, 55, 58, 263, 352 note, 413. Venice, visits, 162-166. Verplanck, Mr., 381. Victoria, Princess, 435, 437. Vignolles, Rev. Mr., 424. Villafranca, Marques de, 197. Villemain, A. F., 131, 133, 139. Villers, pamphlet in defence of Gottingen University, 11. Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, record of his death, 438. Villiers, Hon., Edward, 437 and note. Villiers, Hon. Mrs. Edward, 437 and note. Villiers, Mrs., 418. Virginia, visits, 26, 31-38. Vogel von Vogelstein, 482, 490. Volkel, 121. Von der Hagen, 496. Von Raumer, Friedrich, 485. Voss, J. H., 105, 106, 124, 125, 126. Voss, Madame, 125, 126. Voss, Professor, 113. Vo