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of the column, and was ordered to push to Loudon, and, if possible, save the pontoon-bridge across the Tennessee, held by a brigade of the enemy, commanded by General Vaughn. The cavalry moved with such rapidity as to capture every picket; but the brigade of Vaughn had artillery in position, covered with earthworks, and displayedVaughn had artillery in position, covered with earthworks, and displayed a force too respectable to be carried by a cavalry dash, and darkness closed in before General Howard's infantry got in. The enemy abandoned that place in the night, destroying the pontoons, running three locomotives and forty-eight cars into the Tennessee, and abandoning a large quantity of provisions, four guns, and other mam Loudon and had formed a pretty good ford for his wagons and horses at Davis, seven miles from Morgantown, and had made an ingenious bridge of the wagons left by Vaughn at Loudon, on which to pass his men. He marched by Unitia and Louisville. On the night of the fifth, all the heads of columns communicated at Marysville, where I
under, may not be altogether out of order. Tuesday, November 17.--The storm is upon us. Longstreet's legions are investing Knoxville. Our boys are skirmishing already with their lines on the Lenoir road. General Sanders, with the One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois, Forty-fifth Ohio, Eighth Michigan, and Twelfth Kentucky, are in front. The sharp crack of musketry is heard, growing more and more frequent, and the affair is getting serious. The town is filled with rumors of coming rebels. Vaughn, it is said, has crossed the river below, and will attack our positions on the south bank. A. P. Hill is marching with two corps from Virginia, and Pegram, Forrest, and Wheeler are crossing the Watauga toward the Gap, to cut off our retreat and supplies. In the mean time, as an offset, our forage-trains are bringing in corn and hay from eight miles south of the river, and the telegraph north is still working. We are anxious, of course, to know what Longstreet's intentions are. Doubtless