hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Charles S. Venable or search for Charles S. Venable in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. (search)
nd, while General Gregg came up and urged him to do as the Capture of a part of the burning Union breastworks on the Brock road on the afternoon of May 6. from a sketch made at the time. men wished. At that moment a member of his staff (Colonel Venable) directed his attention to General Longstreet, whom he had been looking for, and who was sitting on his horse near the Orange Plank road. With evident disappointment General Lee turned off and joined General Longstreet. The ground over wl and confined to his tent at the time; but, as showing his purpose had he been able to keep the saddle, he was heard to say, as he lay prostrated by sickness, We must strike them a blow; we must never let them pass us again. Statement of Colonel Venable of General Lee's staff.--E. M. L. Whatever General Lee did, his men thought it the best that could be done under the circumstances. Their feeling toward him is well illustrated by the remark of a ragged rebel who took off his hat to the gen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Lee in the Wilderness campaign. (search)
General Lee in the Wilderness campaign. by Charles S. Venable, Lieutenant-Colonel, C. S. A., of General Lee's staff. Uniform of the Maryland Guard, C. B. A. During the winter of 1863-64 General Lee's headquarters were near Orange Court House. They were marked by the same bare simplicity and absence of military form and display which always characterized them. Three or four tents of ordinary size, situated on the steep hillside, made the winter home of himself and his personal staff. It was without sentinels or guards. He used during the winter every exertion for filling up the thin ranks of his army and for obtaining the necessary supplies for his men. There were times in which the situation seemed to be critical in regard to the commissariat. The supplies of meat were brought mainly from the States south of Virginia, and on some days the Army of Northern Virginia had not more than twenty-four hours rations ahead. On one occasion the general received by mail an anony