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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charles S. Venable or search for Charles S. Venable in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
of Northern Virginia Association. We are indebted to the publishers, Randolph & English, Richmond, for a copy of this book, which is now ready for delivery. It is a book of 348 pages, and contains: 1. A report of the great Lee Memorial Meeting in Richmond in November, 1870, with the splendid orations delivered on the occasion by President Davis and others. 2. Reports of the annual reunions of the Virginia Division Army of Northern Virginia, together with the addresses of Colonel C. S. Venable in 1873; Colonel Charles Marshall in 1874; Major John W. Daniel in 1875; Captain W. Gordon McCabe in 1876; Leigh Robinson, Esq., in 1877; Colonel William Allan in 1878; and General Fitzhugh Lee in 1879. 3. A carefully-prepared Roster of the Army of Northern Virginia. 4. A statement of the Relative Numbers of the Army of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac at their principal battles. As to how the compiler has done his work we may not speak; but we may say that thes
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee to the rear --the incident with Harris' Mississippi brigade. (search)
authenticated : Letter from General N. H. Harris.Vicksburg, August 24th, 1871. Colonel Charles S. Venable, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.: Dear Sir — I am about to trespass upealth and prosperity, I am, Colonel, truly your friend, N. H. Harris. Letter from Colonel C. S. Venable.University of Virginia, November 24th, 1871. To General N. H. Harris: My Dear Generalhe Mississippians into battle at Spotsylvania. I am, General, very truly, your friend, Charles S. Venable. It may be well to add that there is really no conflict in the several accounts we ha Harris' Mississippi brigade. As completing his account of the three incidents, we quote Colonel Venable's description of the scene in the Wilderness, and with Gordon's division, as given in his adisputed ground between our troops and the portion of the line still held by the enemy. Colonel Venable, in this splendid address on The campaign from the Wilderness to Petersburg, also gives a v
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of Battery Gregg. (search)
his lines without further aid. General Lee then ordered me to report to Major-General Wilcox, near the Newman house on the Boydton plank road. I moved my command at quick time and found Gen'l Wilcox on the plank road, not far from the Newman house. As I approached I saw that the enemy had broken through his lines in heavy force, and was extending in line of battle across the open fields in the direction of the South-side railroad. General Wilcox says (July No., 1877, page 16): Colonel Venable, aid-de-camp to General Lee, soon joined me, with a message that Harris's brigade would report in a few minutes; it numbers over five hundred muskets. Heavy masses of the enemy were soon seen moving forward from their entrenched lines in a direction to cross ours near the Carnes House. It was useless to attempt to engage them with the force I had; Harris was therefore ordered forward a little beyond the Banks house — advanced skirmishers, but with orders not to become engaged with his