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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army. You can also browse the collection for Charles S. Venable or search for Charles S. Venable in all documents.

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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 2: influence of Christian officers. (search)
tian officers. No army, with whose history I am acquainted, at least, was ever blessed with so large a proportion of high officers who were earnest Christian men, as the Army of Northern Virginia. We had at first such specimens of the Christian soldier as R. E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, D. H. Hill, T. R. Cobb, A. H. Colquitt, Kirby Smith, J. E. B. Stuart, W. N. Pendleton, John B. Gordon, C. A. Evans, A. M. Scales, Willie Pegram, Lewis Minor Coleman, Thos. H. Carter, Carter Braxton, Charles S. Venable, and a host of others too numerous to mention. And during the war Generals Ewell, Pender, Hood, R. H. Anderson, Rodes, Paxton, W. H. S. Baylor, Colonel Lamar, and a number of others of our best officers professed faith in Christ. Nor was the example of these noble men merely negative— many of them were active workers for the Master, and did not hesitate, upon all proper occasions, to stand up for Jesus. Our Christian President, Jefferson Davis, was always outspoken on the side o
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 4: influence of Christian officers—concluded. (search)
Perhaps the most prominent characteristic of his moral nature was his conscientiousness. In little matters, as in those more important, he was accustomed to ask, and to act upon the answer, what is duty? His conceptions of duty, says Major Venable, one of his earliest and latest friends, were as true and direct as his performance of it was thorough and exact. This is imitable by all. Persevering industry, including earnest attention to little things, was another marked feature of LAnd this trait of heart, too, is imitable. Throwing its soft light over all these excellencies was his beautiful humility. He rarely made himself, or anything that he did, the theme of conversation. He was a man of few professions, says Major Venable, and his Christianity found more expression in action than words; yet it was not difficult to read the clear simplicity of his life and character. He never seemed himself aware that there was anything especially meritorious or unusual in h