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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charles S. Venable or search for Charles S. Venable in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Georgia Infantry. (search)
uld have made him useful to his kind in whatever arena he might have been cast. During the winter of 1863-‘64, he was detached, with his command, by General Lee, in trusted service, in the Valley of Virginia. Of his conduct therein, Colonel Charles S. Venable, acting adjutant-general of the Army of Northern Virginia, wrote him, March 3d, 1864: * * * He [General Lee] directs me to say to you that he is much gratified with your success and with the manner in which you have conducted your operations. In estimate further of the value in which General Lee held the qualities of Colonel Willis, Colonel Venable continues, He wishes you to finish them [the operations] as soon as practicable so as to be able to report to your brigade in time for active operations. The premature death of Colonel Willis, at the battle of Mechanicsville, at the head of his regiment, May 31st, 1864, deprived the army of an admirable and intrepid officer, when his services were claimed in a higher station,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Monument to General Robert E. Lee. (search)
n, Henry A. Wise, George E. Pickett, D. H. Maury, M. D. Corse, J. H. Lane, James L. Kemper, J. A. Walker, and others; Colonels Thomas H. Carter, Hilary P. Jones, Thomas L. Preston, Robert S. Preston, William Allan, William Preston Johnston, Charles S. Venable, Charles Marshall, Walter H. Taylor, Henry E. Peyton, and Robert E. Withers; Commodore M. F. Maury, Captain R. D. Minor, of the Confederate States Navy, and scores of others of our leading officers, and hosts of the ragged veterans of the rs will be remembered, and when the monument we build shall have crumbled into dust, his virtues will live, a high model for the imitation of generations yet unborn. Other addresses. Mr. Davis was followed in eloquent addresses by Colonel Charles S. Venable, General John S. Preston, General John B. Gordon, Colonel Charles Marshall, General Henry A. Wise, Colonel William Preston Johnston, and Colonel Robert E. Withers. Resolutions were then passed organizing an association to erect a mon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
ing, West Virginia; John P. Richardson, South Carolina; United States Senators W. H. Kenna, Samuel Pascoe; Colonel William Lamb. Members of General Robert E. Lee's staff, Colonels Walter. H. Taylor, Charles Marshall, T. M. R. Talcott, Colonel Charles S. Venable. Members of General Lee's family, Misses Mildred and Mary Lee, General W. H. F. Lee, wife and sons, Bolling and R. E. Lee, nephews. General Fitzhugh Lee, the chief marshal, and his chief of staff, General John R. Cooke, rode into Br hundred people. Among the first to arrive there were Bishop Gallagher of Louisiana, Honorable J. L. M. Curry, and Mr. John Dunlop. During the exercises the following persons had seats on this stand: General A. L. Long of Virginia; Colonel Charles S. Venable, University of Virginia; Colonel Walter H. Taylor, Norfolk; Colonel Charles Marshall, Baltimore; and Colonel T. M. R. Talcott, Richmond—all members of General R. E. Lee's staff; Generals Charles W. Field of Kentucky, D. A. Weisiger of V
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
attles for the Union, 142. Sparrow, The English, 24. Stiles, Major, Robert, 297. Stone, D. M., 355. Stringfellow, Rev., Frank, 357. Surgeons, Skill, Acumen and Devotion of, 7, 12. Tariff, The, 93. Tattnall, Commodore, Josiah, 83. Taylor, General, Zachary, 126. Testimonials from Visitors at the Dedication of the Lee Monument, 306. Texas, Annexation of, 435; Troops at the Dedication of the Lee Monument, 269. Torpedoes, 83. Valley Campaign of Stonewall Jackson, 55. Venable, Col. Charles S., 160. Veteran Camps, 279. Virginia Cavalry, Itinerary of the 4th, 377. Virginia, Characteristics of the State and People of, 320. Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions of 1798-‘99, 90. Virginia Infantry, The 1st, Casualties in, at the Battle of Gettysburg, 407.. Virginia Military Institute, Cadets of the, 271. Virginia Troops at the Dedication of the Lee Monument, 271, 272, 291. Von Zinken, Col., 96. Waddy, Col. J. R., 68. War, The Army of the, 132.