Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Venable or search for Venable in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 7 (search)
ves. A. P. Hill moves. battle of Mechanicsville. Porter's retreat. A. P. Hill's advance. Gaines Mill position. the chances. Jackson at Cold Harbor. Porter's account. Hill's account. Lee's account. Jackson ordered in. general advance. enemy's escape. casualties. remarks. When Gen. Lee, on June 1, 1862, took command of the Army of Northern Virginia, he brought with him his personal staff, — Col. R. H. Chilton, Adjutant, Col. A. L. Long, Military Secretary, and Majs. Taylor, Venable, Marshall, and Talcotts, as Aides. He retained the chiefs of all departments, — Corley as Quartermaster, Cole as Commissary, Guild as Medical Director, and myself as Ordnance Officer, — and all matters of routine went on as before. The chances of a successful campaign against McClellan had increased greatly when Johnston fell, wounded, as has been already told. Johnston had proposed the concentration at Richmond of a large force, to be drawn from points farther south. Lee would be abl<
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
ack from his meeting with Grant — seemed to sweep over the field. All felt the bond which held them together. There was no speaking, but the effect was as of a military sacrament. Dr. Boggs, a S. C. chaplain riding with the staff, said to Col. Venable, Lee's aid, Does not it make the General proud to see how these men love him? Venable answered, Not proud. It awes him. He rode along our lines close enough to look into our faces and then we marched in review and went back to our camps. Venable answered, Not proud. It awes him. He rode along our lines close enough to look into our faces and then we marched in review and went back to our camps. Army of the Potomac, May 4, 1864 2D corps. Hancock DIVISIONSBRIGADESartillery BarlowMilesSmythFrankBrookeTidball GibbonWebbOwenCarroll10 Batts. BirneyWardHayes60 Guns MottMcAllester Brewster 5TH corps. Warren GriffinAyresSweitzerBartlettWainwright RobinsonLeonardBaxterDennison9 Batts. CrawfordMcCandlessFisher54 Guns WadsworthCutlerRiceStone 6TH corps. Sedgwick, Wright WrightBrownRussellUptonShalerTompkins GettyWheatonGrantNeillEustis9 Batts. RickettsMorrisSeymour54 Guns 9TH
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
t on the part of our men, our advance made no progress, and the increased fire told of large forces already in our front. Lee was up at an early hour and sent Col. Venable to Gordon to inquire how he progressed. Gordon's answer was:— Tell Gen. Lee I have fought my corps to a frazzle, and I fear I can do nothing unless I am hrps. When Lee received this message, he exclaimed: — Then there is nothing left me but to go and see Gen. Grant, and I would rather die a thousand deaths. Venable writes:— Convulsed with passionate grief, many were the wild words which we spoke as we stood around him. Said one, Oh, General! What will history say of theounted, labelled S. Side James River, and with Lee's autograph upon it. He had carried it in his breast pocket for months, and when he finally rode to meet Grant, Venable took it to burn. I cut off and preserved the outside fold with his label and signature. — Well, we have come to the Junction, and they seem to be here ahead