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Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 14 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 25, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for C. S. Venable or search for C. S. Venable in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General C. M. Wilcox on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
the north side of the James on the 27th March, and not until six days after did General Longstreet become aware of it and make his night march to reach Petersburg, and arrived, as he states, at early dawn. It was near 7 A. M. on the 2d that Colonel Venable, Aidde-Camp to General Lee, came to me on the Boydton plank-road, a mile in advance of the Petersburg line of defences, and informed me that General Lee wished the enemy to be checked and delayed aslong as possible, for Longstreet's troops had not yet arrived to fill the gap between the right of our lines and the Appomattox. Colonel Venable brought with him General Harris' brigade of Mahone's division. The enemy were delayed an hour or more, and when the troops were finally withdrawn to the Petersburg line of defences, General Longstreet's troops began to arrive, and Field's division, or the most of it, came up and was placed in the interval between the right of our lines and the Appomattox. There could have been no occasion fo