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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charles S. Venable or search for Charles S. Venable in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ederals and got a general idea of the nature of the ground. About sunrise General Lee sent Colonel Venable, of his staff, to General Ewell's headquarters, ordering him to make a reconnoissance of thont, with a view of making the main attack on his left, A short time afterwards he followed Colonel Venable in person. He returned at about 9 o'clock and informed me that it would not do to have Ewethe time I did attack. This is not only absurd but impossible. After sunrise that morning Colonel Venable and General Lee were at Ewell's headquarters discussing the policy of opening the attack wif July, 1863. Yours truly, A. L. Long. To General Longstreet. I add the letter of Colonel Venable, of General Lee's staff, which should of itself be conclusive. I merely premise it with thent with the idea of an attack at sunrise by any portion of the army. Yours, very truly, Chas. S. Venable. I add upon this point the letter of Dr. Cullen, medical director of the First corps: