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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charles S. Venable or search for Charles S. Venable in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Southern Historical Society Papers. (search)
e at the Branch House, just west of the Willcox farm, is the point of destination of this staff-officer, who is Colonel Charles S. Venable, aide-de-camp to General Lee. Colonel Venable is bearing a message to General Mahone, who was then, as he had bColonel Venable is bearing a message to General Mahone, who was then, as he had been since the wounding of General Longstreet at the battle of the Wilderness, in command of Anderson's division, which was composed of the brigades of General William Mahone (Virginians), General A. R. Wright (Georgians), General J. C. C. Saunders (er which to the veteran plainly bespoke serious work, and that in the near future. In a written statement made by Colonel Venable in 1872, referring to the carrying of the message from General Lee to General Mahone, he says: He sent me directl General Meade issued his orders above referred to. Against this statement as to time we may safely place that of Colonel Venable, of General Lee's staff, made in 1872, in which he says: I know that it is difficult to be accurate as to time on th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
he following communication is still in my possession: headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, on battlefield, May 13, 1864. General C. M. Wilcox, Commanding Division: General: General Lee directs me to acknowledge the receipt of the flags captured by Lane's brigade in its gallant charge of yesterday, and to say that they will be forwarded to the Hon. Secretary of War with the accompanying note and the names of the brave captors. I am, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, C. S. Venable, A. D. C. The Index is again mistaken when it says, Instead of achieving success at Jericho Ford May 24th, as Pollard relates, his brigades (Lane's and McGowan's) behaved most disgracefully and were replaced by Davis's and Cooke's troops, of Heth's division. The Thirty-seventh regiment alone of my brigade behaved badly on that occasion; but in justice to this regiment it must be remembered that it lost its colonel and many of its bravest company officers in the fight of the 12th.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9 (search)
nfilade from the guns of the salient, their musketry rattled in deep and deadly fire on the enemy that stood in overwhelming numbers but a few yards from their front. Those brave North Carolinians had thus, in one of the hottest conflicts of the day, succeeded in driving the enemy from the works that had been occupied during the previous night by a brigade which, until the 12th of May, had never yet yielded to a foe—the Stonewall. In an address before the Army of Northern Virginia, Colonel Venable, of Lee's staff, says; The restoration of the battle on the 12th, thus rendering utterly futile the success achieved by Hancock's Corps at daybreak, was a wonderful feat of arms, in which all the troops engaged deserve the greatest credit for endurance, constancy and unflinching courage. But without unjust discrimination, we may say that Gordon, Rodes and Ramseur were the heroes of this bloody day. * * * * Rodes and Ramseur were destined, alas! in a few short months, to lay down their
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General John Rogers Cooke. (search)
had been finished, and work all along it was progressing satisfactorily. Several times during the ride General Lee remarked to the thoroughly confused brigadier: This seems to be completed, and finally when the end of the portion of the work to which Cooke's men had been assigned had been reached, he turned with a quiet smile and said: I think, General, it will be finished all right. If not it will be the first time that Cooke and his North Carolinians failed to do their duty. Colonel Charles S. Venable, who was of the staff of General Lee, and who now fills a chair at the University of Virginia, adds the following tribute: The death of General John R. Cooke recalls a splendid achievement of the two North Carolina brigades commanded by him and General William McRae, on August 15, 1864, when Generals A. P. Hill and Wade Hampton were sent to attack Hancock's corps at Reams' Station, on the Petersburg and Weldon railroad. Hancock held, with strong force, the railroad embankment a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Southern Historical Society: its origin and history. (search)
Maury, Governor John Letcher, General Fitzhugh Lee, General Eppa Hunton, General Thomas T. Munford, Colonel R. E. Withers, General James H. Lane, General Gabriel C. Wharton, General R. D. Lilley, Dr. J. L. M. Curry, Rev. J. William Jones, Colonel C. S. Venable, Colonel John A. Sloan, General W. R. Terry, General William Terry, Colonel William Preston Johnston, Colonel Robert T. Preston, F. R. Farrar, General B. H. Robertson, Captain J. W. C. Davis and General J. A. Early. The Committee on Pehis post in the Executive Committee June 18, 1888, whilst he was United States Minister at Bogota, South America. There have been other changes in the Executive Committee by death and other causes, and by appointments to vacancies. Colonel Charles S. Venable, University of Virginia. Colonel William Preston Johnston, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va. Colonel Robert E. Withers, Wytheville, Va. Colonel Joseph Mayo, Richmond, Va. Rev. John Wm. Jones, Richmond, Va., Lieutenant-C
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
his article The colored Troops at Petersburg, 26. Thompson, Major, James. Death of. 283. Townsend Library, The, formed by Thomas T. Townsend, its purchase by Congress recommended. 382. Turner, Adjutant John R., 12. Tyler, Hon. Lyon G., 364. United Confederate Veterans, Second Anniversary of the organization of, 289. United States Naval Records office, 364. United States War Records office, 364. Valley of Virginia, Campaign in 1864, 80, 243. Vance, Gov. Z. B., 407. Venable, Col. Charles S.,4; his tribute to Gen. John R. Cooke, 325. Walker's Nicaragua Expedition, 287. Walker, Gen., R. Lindsay, Death of, 93. Walker, Dr., Thomas, The Kentucky pioneer, 288. Walthall, Hon. E. C.. Address on the South, 298. War for Southern Independence, Causes of the, 221; History of the, 382. War Records Office, Courtesies of, 364. Weisiger. Gen D. A., 7 36. Wilcox, Gen. C. M., Injustice to, 77: Mentioned, 417; Death of, 94. Wilcox Farm, 4, 21. Wildern