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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Thomas M. Vincent or search for Thomas M. Vincent in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
pounders in the sea face, and four or five lighter guns, chiefly howitzers on the land-side. A short distance in front of the right of the line an inward bend of Vincent's creek narrowed the island in such manner as to render it obligatory upon an attacking force to deliver its assault only against the left half of the fort, and age, the Fifth Company battles for Atlanta, till Hood must leave, for Jonesboroa is gone, and Hardee's heroic corps can stand the pressure no longer. Here Frazer, Vincent, Delery, find their death, and also that unrecorded priest who followed us into battle. And now it is on to Nashville. In snow we move from Florence to the task many of his old friends. Despite the pouring rain, a fine audience assembled at the Casino, and among those on the platform were General C. C. Augur, General Thos. M. Vincent, and General Swiser, of the United States Army, while scattered through the audience were a number who wore the blue in the late war, but were willing to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of service in Charleston Harbor in 1863. (search)
arranged for flanking fires, extending to the marsh. The parapets were solid, and a broad, deep, dry moat added boldness to their profile. Within the parade were bomb-proofs and lightly constructed barracks for the small garrison that had heretofore occupied the work. The armament consisted of one 10-inch Columbiad and some 32-pounders in the sea face, and four or five lighter guns, chiefly howitzers on the land-side. A short distance in front of the right of the line an inward bend of Vincent's creek narrowed the island in such manner as to render it obligatory upon an attacking force to deliver its assault only against the left half of the fort, and also affording scant opportunity for the deployment of such a column. In point of fact this peculiar feature in the topography proved of great service to us, and correspondingly troublesome to the enemy in the operations that followed. The surface of the island is but little raised above the level of the sea and presents a glaring
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
Chattahoochie. For Johnston waits to strike his crawling foe. But Peach-Tree Creek soon called us to our work, and in defending its passage we lose Legare and Percy and Ricketts. Legare, who begged for one more shot at them, and fell with Percy, torn and mangled, before he could get it. First on the right, then through the siege, the Fifth Company battles for Atlanta, till Hood must leave, for Jonesboroa is gone, and Hardee's heroic corps can stand the pressure no longer. Here Frazer, Vincent, Delery, find their death, and also that unrecorded priest who followed us into battle. And now it is on to Nashville. In snow we move from Florence to the task, ill clad and badly shod. Columbia is taken, and Franklin's ditches are made level with Confederate dead. Bates's division is thrown toward Murfreesboro. At Overall creek it is Leverich's canister saving us from destruction, and riderless horses sweep in line of battle, through our intervals, to the rear. Siebrecht is buried o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ad made all arrangements to give us a hearty reception and elegant entertainment. The committee met us at the depot, and escorted us to comfortable quarters at the Menger Hotel. General Fitzhugh Lee—as a young officer of the famous old Second Cavalry—had been accustomed to stop at this hotel in 1859-60, and he met in San Antonio many of his old friends. Despite the pouring rain, a fine audience assembled at the Casino, and among those on the platform were General C. C. Augur, General Thos. M. Vincent, and General Swiser, of the United States Army, while scattered through the audience were a number who wore the blue in the late war, but were willing to hear the story of Chancellorsville, told by a gallant, and true Confederate. General Lee had some of the same class of hearers everywhere he lectured, and many of them took occasion to express their great pleasure at hearing him, and high gratification at the character of his address. Major Jacob Waelder presided on the occasio