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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Virginians or search for Virginians in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 9.-the battle of West-point, Va. Fought May 7, 1862. (search)
ng body of villains I ever beheld, and as for honor and mercy, they know not the first principles of such excellent virtues. They are lost to all sense of honor, and should be used as dogs. Our men were brought in rapidly — many fine officers killed — and several men killed with Minie-balls and their throats cut from ear to ear! Savages themselves would blush at such barbarity. Gen. Newton conducted the engagement, Gen. Franklin arriving at twelve M. on the field. It was a beautifully planned battle, and they expected to drive us into the river. We had twenty thousand men against us, composed of Tennesseeans, Texan volunteers, Louisiana Tigers, Virginians, and Alabamians, beside the Hampton Legion. Our men fought like tigers, although they suffered severely. We are expecting to meet them again to-day, and will give them another chance at us. We are surrounded by them here, but we are bound to be in Richmond soon. Believe me, ever, your affectionate son, James E. Montgom
eaves, and laid down, drawing his blanket and overcoat about him. His uniform and face betokened an officer of some rank. All of the above were of the Yankee slain. During Tuesday night, those engaged in carrying the confederate wounded off the field could not use their lanterns, as every flicker from them was sure to draw the fire of the Yankees. . . . . Nothing was to be found on this portion of the field but killed and wounded Yankees and their guns and knapsacks. A mute, and to Virginians a most interesting story, was told by these knapsacks. Upwards of three hundred of them belonged to the famous New-York Seventh regiment who were once so feasted and fondled in this city. If a remnant of them return to the Empire City, they may say with truth that on Virginia soil they were appropriately welcomed on the occasion of both their visits as friends and foes. [The Seventh regiment alluded to was not on the field.--Ed.] Address of Jefferson Davis. Richmond, Va. soldier
efficient action is absolutely necessary. We have a gallant army in the field, upon whom we fully and confidently rely; but no effort should be spared which can contribute to the noble object. The capital of Virginia must not be surrendered. Virginians must rally to the rescue. L. S. Given under my hand and under the seal of the Commonwealth, at Richmond, this fifteenth day of May, 1862, and in the eighty-sixth year of the Commonwealth. John Letcher. The meeting thus called assembleh surrendered in that event. The government is not only just but wise in its determination to stand by Virginia to the last. . . . . To lose Richmond is to lose Virginia, and to lose Virginia is to lose the key to the Southern Confederacy. Virginians, Marylanders, ye who have rallied to her defence, would it not be better to fall in her streets than to basely abandon them, and view from the surrounding hills the humiliation of the capital of the Southern Confederacy? To die in her streets
efficient action is absolutely necessary. We have a gallant army in the field, upon whom we fully and confidently rely; but no effort should be spared which can contribute to the noble object. The capital of Virginia must not be surrendered. Virginians must rally to the rescue. L. S. Given under my hand and under the seal of the Commonwealth, at Richmond, this fifteenth day of May, 1862, and in the eighty-sixth year of the Commonwealth. John Letcher. The meeting thus called assembleh surrendered in that event. The government is not only just but wise in its determination to stand by Virginia to the last. . . . . To lose Richmond is to lose Virginia, and to lose Virginia is to lose the key to the Southern Confederacy. Virginians, Marylanders, ye who have rallied to her defence, would it not be better to fall in her streets than to basely abandon them, and view from the surrounding hills the humiliation of the capital of the Southern Confederacy? To die in her streets