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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Virginians or search for Virginians in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
liam Ryan, Rev. Dr. John B. Newton, General Archer Anderson, Colonel Frank G. Ruffin and Judge Waller R. Staples, of Richmond; Ex-Governor Fitzhugh Lee, of Glasgow; Judge William J. Robertson, of Charlottesville; General Eppa Hunton, of Warrenton; Major Holmes Conrad, of Winchester; Hon. John Goode, of Norfolk, and Hon. Taylor Berry, of Amherst. Most of these gentlemen were personal friends of the deceased statesman, but there was no purpose of limiting the committee, except to representative Virginians. This committee met at Richmond on December 2, 1891, and were aided by the presence and counsel of a number of distinguished gentlemen, including members of the General Assembly of Virginia. General Joseph R. Anderson was elected chairman, and a committee was appointed to draft a charter of incorporation. The organization was afterwards perfected by the selection of a Board of Directors, with Dr. G. Watson James as Secretary, and Colonel William H. Palmer as Treasurer of the A
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
ing a newly-arrived cadet to his quarters. The personal appearance of the stranger was so remarkable as to attract the attention of several of us, who were standing near and chatting together. Burkett Fry, A. P. Hill, and George Pickett, all Virginians, and destined to be distinguished generals, made our group. The new cadet was clad in gray homespun, a waggoner's hat, and large, heavy brogans; weather-stained saddlebags were over his shoulders. His sturdy step, cold, bright gray eye, thin,ription to the negro Sunday-school is due—it is fifty cents—which I send by the courier. Nothing more. At the First Manassas his fame was made, when that noble soldier, Bernard Bee, cried out to his wavering men, See where Jackson, with his Virginians, stands like a stone wall! Let us form behind them. After the repulse at Malvern Hill, General Lee and other generals were discussing the situation, and what we were to do in the morning. Jackson was lying upon the ground, apparently slumb
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. (search)
000 troops. In April, 1862, he and his brigade were, upon his request, ordered to Yorktown, Va., to reinforce General Magruder. He participated in numerous assaults and skirmishes on the peninsula, and in the battles of Williamsburg and Seven Pines. In June, 1862, General Colston was stricken down with a severe attack of fever and jaundice, from which he did not recover until the following December; when he reported for duty and was assigned to the command of a brigade of Southwestern Virginians, and was ordered to Petersburg. In April, 1863, by request of Stonewall Jackson, who had been for ten years his colleague in the faculty of the Virginia Military Institute, and knew him well, General Colston was assigned to the command of a brigade in Trimble's division, of Jackson's corps. At Chancellorsville, at 6 o'clock P. M., May 2, 1863, the hour when Stonewall Jackson ordered his corps of 26,000 men to disclose their presence in rear of the right flank of General Hooker's gran