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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Virginians or search for Virginians in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
avis stood up in the carriage, preparatory to alighting, a stentorian voice shouted: Hats off, Virginians, and five thousand bare-headed men did homage to him who had suffered for them, and with moiste abreast of Time; Shall light up stately history And blaze in Epic Rhyme— Both patriots, both Virginians, true; Both rebels; both sublime! And should our children, and our children's children, apo hospital in Richmond, for three months, with great joy at the thought of going home. Some Virginians charged immediately on the right of the Fifth. As we retreated we came to a long, wide lagoonhree to four feet deep. In some way, unknown to me, I attracted the attention of one of those Virginians, a giant of a fellow. I knew he was a Virginian by his regimental designation on his coat-slrough was severely and it was then thought mortally wounded; but careful nursing by hospitable Virginians in the Bull Run mountains restored him in time (in the latter part of 1862) to take the captai
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
the rebel yell was their only applause, their happiest greeting. It was the outburst from brave men who could thus best give expression to their indignation for what was past and their joy for the present. As the carriage approached the hotel all sounds ceased, and a deep and solemn silence fell upon the vast crowd, less demonstrative than the yell, but more tender in its sympathy. As Mr. Davis stood up in the carriage, preparatory to alighting, a stentorian voice shouted: Hats off, Virginians, and five thousand bare-headed men did homage to him who had suffered for them, and with moistened eye and bated breath stood silent and still until their representative entered the hotel. The treatment which the Federal government had imposed upon Mr. Davis had made him a martyr; the applause was an attestation of that fact. Around the court-room were thousands of men who had met danger and suffered loss. Each man felt that Davis had suffered vicariously for him. If Davis was a trait
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The life and character of Robert Edward Lee. (search)
hall be sung. The Father of his Country, Towers above the land-locked sea, A glorious symbol to the world Of all that's great and free; And to-day Virginia matches him With the stately form of Lee. And here to-day, my countrymen, I tell you Lee shall ride With that great rebel down the years— Twin rebels side by side! And confronting such a vision All our grief gives place to pride. Those two shall ride immortal, And shall ride abreast of Time; Shall light up stately history And blaze in Epic Rhyme— Both patriots, both Virginians, true; Both rebels; both sublime! And should our children, and our children's children, apply to their own conduct, as men and as citizens, that supremest lesson which those models teach: That above the glamour of glory and the spell of genius— The greatest greatness goodness is. Then shall the future witness in this Old Dominion a moral, social and political structure of such perfect grandeur as eye hath not seen nor the mind of man conc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Brook Church fight, and something about the Fifth North Carolina cavalry. (search)
length, and he never recovered use of it during his lifetime. He got an honorable discharge for the war, and I got a furlough June 5th from Chimborazo hospital in Richmond, for three months, with great joy at the thought of going home. Some Virginians charged immediately on the right of the Fifth. As we retreated we came to a long, wide lagoon in a ravine, back of where we began the charge. The water was three to four feet deep. In some way, unknown to me, I attracted the attention of one of those Virginians, a giant of a fellow. I knew he was a Virginian by his regimental designation on his coat-sleeve. Of his own motion he kindly and tenderly offered to carry me over that water. I thankfully declined, and said to him: I think that I can make it all right. He looked down at me and said: Oh, boy, get on my shoulders. And suiting his action to his words, he stooped down in front of me. I put my arms around his neck, he put his right hand under my right knee, his left holdin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Maryland Warrior and hero. (search)
nearly exhausted, Captain Booth providentially discovered General Pender's brigade moving to the firing, when that gallant officer promptly reinforced Colonel Johnson's decimated but invincible line (in much the same way that the First Maryland and Third Tennessee advanced upon, drove the enemy and saved Jackson's flank at First Manassas.) In this bloody battle of Second Manassas, Captain Goldsborough was severely and it was then thought mortally wounded; but careful nursing by hospitable Virginians in the Bull Run mountains restored him in time (in the latter part of 1862) to take the captaincy of Company G, Second Maryland Infantry (which succeeded the First Maryland), being shortly afterward elected major, under Lieutenant-Colonel James R. Herbert, who had been Captain of Company D, in the First Maryland. Under these brave veterans as field officers, with much active service, the new Maryland battalion soon became a magnificent fighting phalanx. This regiment was in the flank a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.42 (search)
ds of these dear ones should fall upon these lines, we pray them not to turn a deaf ear to our pleadings, but remember the fallen heroes with a liberal contribution, which can be sent to myself. Mrs. L. H. Rinker, Historian of the U. D. C. Chapter, Mt. Jackson. Va. Mrs. Monroe Funkhouser, President. Miss Elizabeth Brooke, Recording Secretary. List of the dead. Following is a list of the Confederate soldiers buried in Our Soldiers Cemetery, at Mount Jackson, Shenandoah county, Va. Virginians. J. D. Brooks, company E, 9th Virginia regiment. Agustus D. Pasley, company D, 13th Virginia regiment. Joseph H. White, company F, 24th Virginia regiment. James A. Woods, company A, 8th Virginia regiment. A. J. Calven, company E, 24th Virginia regiment. Robert McFarland, company K, 53d Virginia regiment. E. M. Evans, company C, 34th Battalion Virginia regiment. Wesley Fletcher, company B, 8th Virginia regiment. Isaac Mills, Jr., company K, 13th Virginia regiment. T. B.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.48 (search)
Confederate dead. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, November 4, 1901.] Buried in the Cemetery at Arlington. Inscriptions on the Headboards. That artificial leg, Again—Mr. Ballard Explains how it came into his Possession—Letter from a Lady on the same subject. Accompanying this communication is appended a list of the Virginia Confederate soldiers buried in the cemetery at Arlington, Va. There are 264 Confederate dead there, of which thirty-three are Virginians. The list is that of the actual inscriptions on the new headstones. These inscriptions have been obtained from the Confederate archives at Washington, and are as nearly accurate as possible. They are to stand for all time. This list has been prepared with great care, with the view that it will find its way into the public libraries throughout our Southland. The new headstones are of the finest white marble, twenty inches high, ten inches wide, and four inches thick. On each one is inscribed the number