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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Virginians or search for Virginians in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dedication of a bronze tablet in honor of Botetourt Battery (search)
you look at these village streets, in the month of May, in the year 1861? Virginia has seceded. We are going to the front, Recruits are hastening in; new companies are forming; all the country is aroused. We drill. We camp. Uniforms and arms are on the way to us from Richmond. In the meantime we wear linsey shirts, and big black hats, tucked up on one side with a rosette of green ribbon. The muskets come. The companies are constantly under arms. We have no parties now; we are all Virginians, we will fight in defense of our mother, and side by side with our brethren of the South! Sermons are preached to the soldiers. The preachers pronounce our cause a just one, and encourage us on to victory or to death. Our people are a unit, our cause is that of liberty, we cannot be overcome. We hear many rumors. The Lexington companies are ordered off. A town meeting is convening. Everything is excitement. Our business is war, and we are attending to it. The ladies give us our flag
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.64 (search)
ho fit under Marse Bob. The Confederate Column takes it as it finds it in the Spectator, adding only the little story at the bottom. We have been furnished by one of McNeil's men, Corporal D. M. Parsons, with a complete list of Captain John H. McNeil's Partisan Rangers, which next to Mosby's Battalion, was the most noted command of scouts that operated in Virginia during the war. Many of them will be recognized as gallant Augusta and Rockingham boys. There are 187 of them, all being Virginians except nineteen, who were from Maryland, and are marked Md. in the list. Officers. McNiel, John H., captain; McNeil, J. C., first lieutenant; Welton, I. S., second lieutenant; Dolan, J. B., third lieutenant; Taylor, Harrison, first sergeant; Vandiver, J. L., second sergeant; Dailey, James, third sergeant; Seymour, Able, fourth sergeant; Hopkins, David, first corporal; Judy, I., second corporal; Oats, I., third corporal; Parsons, D. M., fourth coropral. Privates. Acker, John, Al