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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 18, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Virginians or search for Virginians in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

d by any man, of any party, in this place. It was adopted by the votes of Union men, and asked nothing more than it was right for the Convention to know. We also deem it proper to state, that if our Union must remain disrupted, and we, as Virginians, must make choice between joining the South or being tied to the tail of a Black Republican, negro-equality Government, the people of Wood county, as true Virginians, will go with their Southern brethren. If there are any of our citizens who wan it was right for the Convention to know. We also deem it proper to state, that if our Union must remain disrupted, and we, as Virginians, must make choice between joining the South or being tied to the tail of a Black Republican, negro-equality Government, the people of Wood county, as true Virginians, will go with their Southern brethren. If there are any of our citizens who would not prefer this course, they can only be found among those who are in name or in fact Black Republicans.
nose. Our College is situated on a hill about two miles North of the White House, and commands a view of the whole city. Nearly all of the students — a good many of whom from the extreme South left when their respective States seceded — are Virginians, and nearly all are opposed to any further submission to Abolitionists. We are all locking anxiously for our good old State to make a move in the right direction. Yesterday evening, hearing that a dispatch had been received stating that Virginia had seceded — which, by the way, is contradicted this morning — some of our Virginians, in their enthusiasm, ascended to the roof of the College and raised the Confederate flag, with seven stars in a circle, and one in the centre for Virginia. It is, however, a mere temporary affair, and we hope soon to raise a larger and finer one. There is great excitement in the city and guards are stationed at all the public buildings and on all the roads and bridges leading to the city. An insul
cheers for the Mercury. Lincoln's Proclamation was published here this morning. Nobody seems to care for it; indeed, nobody seems to care for anything that may be done by the Administration and its Northern backers. The people seem to expect war, are ready for war, and would be, I had nearly said, disagreeably disappointed if they don't have war. If Lincoln's Proclamation is bluster, and gotten up for effect, it will have no effect here or elsewhere in the Confederacy. I heard some Virginians to-day laughing heartily at one of the telegrams to the effect that a requisition was to be made on Virginia for 8,000 men to aid in coercion. Examining the baggage is one of the new institutions that has come in with the new Confederacy, and as I was too late for the combat, you must take a description of this in place of more interesting matter. It does not occur directly upon your crossing the line between North Carolina and South Carolina--You are allowed to go on until you reach