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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Virginians or search for Virginians in all documents.

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pitch, by such an awful blow such a crushing of timbers, and such yells of the victors! It was indeed enough to frighten them, especially considering that their enemy was almost invisible.--The city is all agog about the success of the expedition. They will make a great fuss over Warley; but he is too much of a true hero to be spoiled by it. He is one of the coolest and bravest men I ever knew, and none deserves to be praised more than he. The deed required the greatest nerve and decision, and three long hours before the hazard could be determined. Not an act in naval history stands on or deserves a brighter page than this hold and successful exploit of Warley's. And how near a failure! or rather, what a narrow escape he had! One of his engines broke in the collision, and with the remaining one he had barely power to escape. The darkness alone saved him. The fire-rafts — both commanded by Virginians — acted well their part, and added much to the consternation of the enemy."
ork Herald's account of the fight at Harper's Ferry. The Washington correspondent of the New York Herald, of the 17th, contains the following in regard to the late fight at Harper's Ferry, in which the Confederates were successful: "The brilliant achievement of Col. Geary at Harper's Ferry appears almost incredible. The first account received here was regarded as an exaggeration, but it is fully confirmed by dispatches received to-day. Bolivar Heights is a very strong position. With the exception of Turner Ashby's cavalry, the rebel forces engaged were exclusively of the recently drafted Virginians. They were armed with a promiscuous variety of weapons, from shot-guns to horse pistols. There have been numerous reports to-day of a renewal of the fight at Bolivar Heights, but a dispatch was received here this afternoon by Gen. Banks, who is in town, stating that everything was perfectly quiet on the upper Potomac; especially at Harper's Ferry and Bolivar Heights."