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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 19, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Virginians or search for Virginians in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: March 19, 1864., [Electronic resource], Pennsylvania campaign--second day at Gettysburg. (search)
ged and precipitous. Gen. Early, upon hearing Gen. Johnson's infantry engaged, sent forward Hayes's Louisiana and Hoke's North Carolina brigade, (under Col. Avery.) These troops advancing as a storming party, quickly passed over a ridge and down a hill in a valley below they met two lines of the Federals posted behind stone walls. These they charged. At the charge the Federals broke and fled up the hill, closely pursued by our men. (The enemy, after repulsing Gen. Jones's brigade of Virginians, pushed a column down the valley, between them and Gen. Early, with the view of turning Jones's right Bank, but hearing Early's guns they hastily returned.) It was now dark. But Hayes and Avery, still pursuing, pushed the enemy up the hill and stormed the Cemetery heights. Says a most intelligent spectator, who witnessed this charge, "I have never seen or heard anything more intensely exciting and terrible than this contest now became. From the point where I stood, just outside of the t