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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 20 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 16 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 12 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Voltaire or search for Voltaire in all documents.

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sting on a standing military force. Still surrounded by danger, his inflexible and uncontrolled will stamped the impress of harshness even on his necessary policy, of tyranny on his errors of judgment, and of rapine and violence on his measures for aggrandizement. Yet Prussia, which was the favorite disciple of Luther and the child of the Reformation, while it held the sword upright, bore with every creed and set reason free. It offered a shelter to Rousseau, and called in D'Alembert and Voltaire as its guests; it set Semler to hold the Bible itself under the light of criticism; it breathed into the boldly thoughtful Lessing widest hopes for the education of the race to a universal brotherhood on earth; it gave its youth to the teachings of Immanuel Kant, who, for power of analysis and universality, was inferior to none since Aristotle. An army and a treasure do not constitute a power, said Vergennes; but Prussia had also philosophic liberty. All freedom of mind in Germany hailed
t of restraint, though not to total unbelief, Voltaire employed his peerless wit and activity. The and hated prelacy with the rancor of faction; Voltaire waged the same warfare with widely different monarch's mistress as an adorable Egeria. Voltaire à Madame la Comtesse du Barri, 20 Juin, 1773.uch are the words, and such the sentiments of Voltaire, and as he believed of every landholder, the milaville, ler Avril, 1766. The school of Voltaire did not so much seek the total overthrow of dThe age could have learnt, from the school of Voltaire, to scoff at its past; but the studious and o well-informed and virtuous, D'Alembert to Voltaire. most amiable, Voltaire to D'Alembert. andVoltaire to D'Alembert. and of a taste the most delicate and sure; a disinterested man, austere, yet holding it to be every manls of life by trust in God See Rousseau to Voltaire.— he breathed the spirit of revolution into watan, Un je ne sais quel charlatan sausage. Voltaire: Siecle de Louis XV. chap. XLIII. this begga
There free opinion had carried analysis boldly to every question of faith as well as of science. English free-thinkers had led the way in the reaction of Protestant Europe against the blind adoration of the letter of the Bible. English Deists, tracing Christianity to reason and teaching that it was as old as creation, were the forerunners of the German Rationalists. English treatises on the human understanding were the sources of the materialism of France. In the atmosphere of England Voltaire ripened the speculative views which he pub- chap. III.} 1763. lished as English Letters; there Montesquieu sketched a government which should make liberty its end; and from English writings and example Rousseau derived the idea of a social compact. Every Englishman discussed public affairs; busy politicians thronged the coffee-houses; petitions were sent to parliament from popular assemblies; cities, boroughs, and counties framed addresses to the king: and yet, such was the stability of t
Rochefort, to travel through America, under the name of Beaulieu, in the guise of an Acadian wanderer; and while England was taxing America by act of parliament, France was already counting its steps towards independence. Depeche de M. le Cte. de Guerchy à M. le Due de Choiseul, 19 Oct. 1766. The world was making progress; restrictive laws and the oppression of industry were passing away, not less than the inquisition and the oppression of free thought. Every thing that I see, wrote Voltaire, in April; every thing is scattering the seeds of a revolution, which will come inevitably. Light has so spread from neighbor to neighbor, that on the first occasion it will kindle and burst forth. Happy are the young, for their eyes shall see it. The impulse to the revolution was to proceed from the new world, which was roused by the rumor of the bill for the impending regulations. My heart bleeds for America, said Whitefield, at Portsmouth, in New Hampshire. O poor New-England, ther
ge, sullenly predicted to his friends, that every day would produce difficulties in the colonies, and with foreign powers. Within the last twelve years, wrote Voltaire at that time, there has been a marked revolution in the public mind. Light is certainly spreading on all sides. George the Third, without intending it, promoted the revolution which Voltaire anxiously awaited, and hastened results affecting America and the world, of which neither Voltaire nor himself had any preconception. The new ministry did not enter upon their career with any purpose of repealing or changing the stamp act. Many of those whose support was essential to them, amongVoltaire nor himself had any preconception. The new ministry did not enter upon their career with any purpose of repealing or changing the stamp act. Many of those whose support was essential to them, among others, Northington, who remained in the cabinet as chancellor, Yorke, and Charles Towns- chap. XV.} 1765. July. hend, were among its earliest and most strenuous supporters; and the duke of Cumberland was the last man in England to temporize with what he might think to be rebellion. The agents of the colonies seeing among the