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The Daily Dispatch: April 18, 1864., [Electronic resource] 22 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 28, 1862., [Electronic resource] 9 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 27, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 2 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 24, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 2, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 2, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Voorhees or search for Voorhees in all documents.

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tion-Yeas 136; Nays--Messrs. Burnett, (Ky.,) Harding, (Ky.,) Norton, (Mo..) George H. Pendleton, (Ohio,) Reid, (Mo.,) Robinson, (Ill.,) Vallandigham, (Ohio,) Voorhees, (Ind.,) Wadsworth, (Ky.,) and Wood, (N. Y.)--10. This bill came up in the Senate, on the 12th; and, after a brief debate, was passed: Yeas 36; Nays--MesMenzies, Morris, Noble, Norton, Odell, Pendleton, Porter, Reid, Robinson, James S. Rollins, Sheil, Smith, John B. Steele, Stratton, Francis Thomas, Vallandigham, Voorhees, Wadsworth, Webster, and Wickliffe--48. The bill, thus amended, being returned to the Senate, Mr. Trumbull moved a concurrence in the house amendment, which Yeas--Messrs. Allen, Ancona, George H. Browne, Calvert, Cox, Crisfield, Jackson, Johnson, May, Noble, Pendleton, James S. Rollins, Sheil, Smith, Vallandigham, Voorhees, Wadsworth, Ward, and Webster--19. Nays--74. The bill was thereupon passed. Mr. Calvert, of Md., offered the following: That, whilst it is the duty
e men who laid the foundations of the Commonwealth, and compel our noble people to exhaust themselves in furnishing the money to destroy their own freedom? Never, while Kentucky remains the Kentucky of old!--never, while thousands of her gallant sons have the will and the nerve to make the State sing to the music of their rifles! It is clear that Mr. Breckinridge, in his exodus from Kentucky, had perpetrated a serious blunder. As a declaimer in the Senate, in chorus with Vallandigham, Voorhees, and May, he was worth far more to the Confederacy than as a Brigadier in its military service; and even the election of Garret Davis in his stead did not fully compensate the Rebellion for the loss of its boldest and most unscrupulous champion in the Federal Congress. Gen. W. T. Sherman, early in October, succeeded Gen. Anderson in command of the district of Kentucky. The Rebels, with an art which they had already brought to perfection, imposed on him, with success, as on Gen. McClella