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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Daniel Vose or search for Daniel Vose in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
leaving a widow and twelve children; and, two years later, Thomas Vose was appointed his guardian. Job was employed, after his father's death, upon the farm of Daniel Vose At Mr. Vose's house, still standing at the Lower Mills Village in Milton, adjacent to the railway station, were passed, in September, 1774, the Suffolk ResolMr. Vose's house, still standing at the Lower Mills Village in Milton, adjacent to the railway station, were passed, in September, 1774, the Suffolk Resolves, which have been regarded as the earliest organized demonstration for Independence in the American colonies. The centenary of this event was commemorated in this historic house, by proper ceremonies, Sept. 9. 1874. of that town; and one day, when eighteen years of age, he made known, with some emphasis, his purpose to abandonuntil his death, with occasional visits to his friends in New York and Boston, and his relatives in Milton. When in Massachusetts, he was usually the guest of Daniel Vose, at whose house in Milton he had lived before he entered college. In 1787, Governor John Hancock appointed him a justice of the peace,—a distinction then les
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 3: birth and early Education.—1811-26. (search)
opened for admission to the National Military Academy. Charles Pinckney Sumner, in a letter to Colonel Sylvanus Thayer, commanding at West Point, dated July 14, 1829, in which he introduces his son, says: It was once my son's wish to become a member of your institution, but I perceived it to be a hopeless undertaking to procure his admission. The thought of a military education was probably prompted by the circumstance that a relative, Edwin V. Sumner, and a friend of the family, Josiah H Vose, were of the regular army. The father began inquiries in relation to the American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy, under the charge of Captain Alden Partridge, which was first established at Norwich, Vt., and had recently been removed to Middletown, Conn. The school was conducted on a military system, and enrolled cadets from nineteen States. In 1829 it was discontinued, and the present Wesleyan University was established on its site. The father's letter to Captain Partridge give