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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Waddell, James Iredell 1824-1886 (search)
Waddell, James Iredell 1824-1886 Naval officer; born in Pittsboro, N. C., in 1824; graduated at the United States Naval Academy; resigned from the navy in 1861, and entered the Confederate service in the following year; commanded the ram Louisiana at New Orleans till the engagement with Farragut's fleet, when he destroyed that vessel by blowing her up; later was ordered to England, where in 1864 he took command of the Shenandoah, with which he cruised in the Pacific Ocean, destroying vesselEngland, where in 1864 he took command of the Shenandoah, with which he cruised in the Pacific Ocean, destroying vessels till Aug. 2, 1865, when he learned that Lee had surrendered more than three months before. Returning to England he surrendered his vessel to the United States consul at Liverpool, and he and his crew were liberated. the Shenandoah, under Captain Waddell, was the only vessel that ever carried the Confederate flag around the world. He died in Annapolis, Md., March 15, 1886.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah. (search)
l life of the Confederate cruiser. Captain James I. Waddell. Carried the Confederate flag arMemorial Association an address on Captain James Iredell Waddell, who commanded the Confederate crunstructions from the department, gave to Lieutenant Waddell his particular directions. They were totransfer of stores was rapidly made, and Lieutenant Waddell read his commission, and raising the Conive such passengers as were to return. Captain Waddell has left some account of the cruise of thwilling to adventure in such an undertaking. Waddell's force was, indeed, so weak that they could ssments forced themselves on the mind of Lieutenant Waddell. In his memoir of his cruise he wrote: e of the Shenandoah to Captain W. C. Whittle, Waddell's first lieutenant, who has preserved the det trial. Writing of that critical time, Captain Waddell wrote: My own life had been chequertisfaction seen in all countenances, says Captain Waddell, for our success in reaching a European p[10 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
79. Terrell, Colonel, 204. Tom's Brook, Battle of, 10. Toombs, Hon. Robert, 107. Tucker, Commodore J. Randolph, 351. Valley Campaign, The, 10. Vance, Governor Z. B., vindicated, 164. Venable, Colonel Charles S., 236. Vicksburg, Siege of, 115. Virginia, Infantry, the 1st at Gettysburg, 33; casualties of, 39; 21st at Second Manassas, 77; Contribution of to the Confederate States Army, 43. Virginia, The Iron-Clad; what she did, 273; her officers, 249, 347, 348. Waddell, Captain James Iredell, 320. Walker, General James A., 175. Walker, Leroy Pope, 111. Walker, Norman S., 115. Wallace, General Lew, 128. Wallace, General W. H. L., 132. War, 1861-5, Causes of the, 13, 275. War of 1812, 19. Webster, Daniel, 29. Weldon Railroad, Battle of, 337. Wells, Edward L., 41. Wells, Julian L., 13. Wheeler, Major-General Joseph, 41. Whittle, Captain W. C., 223. Wickham, General W. C., 9. Wigfall, General Louis T., 107. Welb