hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 13 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 13 11 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1860., [Electronic resource] 10 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 19, 1860., [Electronic resource] 9 5 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 6 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Wade or search for Wade in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The honor roll of the University of Virginia, from the times-dispatch, December 3, 1905. (search)
, Va., 1862. Townes, E. D., Maj., Ala., Travis, Tex., 1864. Triplett, W. S., Va., Richmond, Va., 1863. Tucker, H. S., Geo., Lt. Col., Va., Charlottesville, Va. 1863. Tupman, P. M., Surg. Va., Essex Co., Va. 1863. Tupper, F., Lt., Ga., Baltimore, Md., 1865. Tureaud, E., Jr., La. Turner, J. C., Lt., Ala., Manassas, Va. 1861. Tyler, L., Va., Bull Run, Va., 1861. Upshaw, G. W., Va. Van de Graaf, W. J., Ala. Vaughan. G. H., Mo. Voss, F., Md., Green River, Ky. Wade, W. M., Va., Norfolk, Va. 1862. Wait, G. H., Ark., Little Rock, Ark., 1863. Walke, I. T., Jr., Lt. Col., Va., Woodstock, Va., 1864. Walker, C., Ala. Walker, J. T., Texas. Walker, S. G., Va., Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Ward, W. N., Va. Wardlaw, R. H., S. C., Gravel's Run, S. C., 1863. Wartelle, F., La., Shiloh, Tenn, 1862. Warwick, B., Surg., Va., Gaines' Mills Va., 1862. Washington, J. A., Lt. Col., Va., W. Va., 1861. Washington, J. E., Lt. Col., S. C., Monterey,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg-Pickett's charge. (search)
so many homes and families, from so many kinsmen and friends; and with it comes the mournful lamentations of Virginia herself, the mother of us all, over the loss of so many of her bravest and best sons. Of her generals Garnett is dead, Armistead is dying; and Kemper desperately wounded. Of her colonels of regiments six are killed on the field, Hodges, Edmonds, Magruder, Williams, Patton, Allen, and Owen is dying and Stuart mortally wounded. Three lieutenant-colonels are killed, Calcutt, Wade and Ellis. Five colonels, Hunton, Terry, Garnett, Mayo and Aylett, are wounded. Four lieutenant-colonels commanding regiments, Martin, Carrington, Otey and Richardson are wounded. Of the whole compliment of field officers in fifteen regiments only one escaped unhurt, Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph C. Cabell. The loss of company officers are in equal proportion. It is a sad, mournful summing up. Let the curtain fall on the tragic scene. But there are some of those who fell on that field who
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee at Gettysburg. (search)
Turnpike, but was repulsed by General Gregg. Would General Meade advance in force? Lee's artillery was put in battery on Semirrary Ridge, and the depleted ranks of the divisions were promptly drawn into line. But both had suffered enormously, and neither was capable of attack. The Confederate loss in the three days was something more than 20,000, one-third of a total of 63,000 of all arms. Dead on the field were Armistead, Garnett, Pender, Barksdale and Semmes. Seriously wounded were Wade, Hampton, Hood, Kemper, Heth, Pettigrew, Trimble, Scales, Jenkins, and S. T. Anderson, while Archer was a prisoner. In an unusual percentage of young regimental and company officers, the flower of the Southland, were left upon the field. Of many of them and a multitude of men in the ranks, the pride and hope of the best of homes, no tidings came back. In unknown graves they sleep, many of them in Hollywood, willing sacrifices, offered to their country and their God. The day after. On