Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for B. F. Wade or search for B. F. Wade in all documents.

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of Congress instructing them to investigate the late Massacre at Fort Pillow, designated two members of the Committee--Messrs. Wade and Gooch--to proceed forthwith to such places as they might deem necessary, and take testimony. That Sub-Committee ho submit the same, with the testimony, to the Senate, and Mr. Gooch to the House, and ask that the same be printed. Messrs. Wade and Gooch, the sub-committee appointed by the Joint Committee on the Conduct and Expenditures of the War, with instrucnds, as among those to whom they are indebted for assistance and attention. All of which is respectfully submitted. B. F. Wade, D. W. Gooch. Adopted by the committee as their report. B. F. Wade, Chairman. testimony. Cairo, Illinois, B. F. Wade, Chairman. testimony. Cairo, Illinois, April 22, 1864. Brigadier-General Mason Brayman sworn and examined by the Chairman. Question. What is your rank and position in the service? Answer. Brigadier-General of volunteers; have been in command of the district of Cairo since March
Doc. 2.-the returned prisoners. In the Senate of the United States. May 9, 1864. Mr. Wade submitted the following report. The Joint Committee on the conduct and expenditures of the war submitted the following report, with the accompanying testimony. On the fourth instant your Committee received a communication of thaion of our men to their country. I do not think their patriotism has ever been equalled in the history of the world. All of which is respectfully submitted. B. F. Wade, Chairman. war Department, Washington City, May 4, 1864. sir: I have the honor to submit to you a report made to this department by Colonel Hoffman, Commissthe past winter will ever again be in a condition to render any service, or even to enjoy life. Your obedient servant, Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Hon. B. F. Wade, Chairman of Joint Committee on Conduct of the War. office of Commissary General of prisoners, Washington, D. C., May 3, 1864. sir: I have the honor to re
prisoners. My movements were quick enough to prevent Wheeler from bringing four cannon he had with him into action, and the stampede of the renowned rebel cavalry was such that, with any thing like an adequate number of cavalry, I could have easily captured the whole command. As it was, I captured five commissioned officers and one hundred and twenty-six men, killed (as far as I was able to learn during my brief stay) eleven rebels, wounded over thirty, amongst them General Kelly and Colonel Wade; and the number of small arms thrown away by the valiant warriors must amount to between three and four hundred. Being obliged to proceed upon my march, I had to leave it to the cavalry to bring in the small arms thrown away, and, I have no doubt, they captured a good many more prisoners, as large numbers of the enemy scattered in different directions to hide in the woods. Wheeler moved post haste into Georgia, with a couple of hundred men of his command, bare-headed, and without arms
lery, Lieutenant Heilman; effective force, officers and men, including battery, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-six. My brigade having the advance, and the Thirty-sixth Indiana marching in front, we marched toward Red Clay, or Council-ground, on the Georgia State-line, a distance of eight miles; arrived there at half-past 12 P. M. I was there ordered by the General commanding the division, to move on the road toward Dalton, and, if possible, find the enemy. I advanced three miles to Wade's farm, and found the enemy's pickets, drove them, and directed Captain Van Antwerp, with his company of Fourth Michigan cavalry, to pursue them, which he did promptly, one and a half miles. Upon the cavalry rejoining the brigade, we returned to Red Clay and rested for the night. February 23d. Marched with the division via Dr. Lee's house twelve miles, to near Catoosa Springs, Georgia, to make a junction with Fourteenth corps; arrived there about nine o'clock P. M. February 24th. Marc