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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 95 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 39 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 32 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 23 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 6 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Benjamin F. Wade or search for Benjamin F. Wade in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 6 document sections:

d be forbidden to take my old mammy [slave-nurse] along with me? --The Senator entirely mistakes our position, responded Mr. Wade, of Ohio. We have not the least objection, and would oppose no obstacle, to the Senator's migrating to Kansas, and takilas, was debated at length, and ably, by Messrs. Douglas and several others in favor and by Messrs. Chase, Seward, Sumner, Wade, and others, in opposition. But the disparity in numbers between its supporters and its opponents was too great — nearly mlin, of Maine; Sumner, of Massachusetts; Foot, of Vermont; Smith, of Connecticut; Fish and Seward, of New York; Chase and Wade, of Ohio; Dodge (Henry), of Wisconsin--10. Nays — Norris and Williams, of New Hampshire; Toucey, of Connecticut; Brodheislature,--which was rejected; Yeas 10; Messrs. Chase, Fessenden, Foot, Hamlin, Norris, Seward, Shields, Smith, Sumner, Wade--10. Nays 30. So far, the bill had been acted on as in Committee of the Whole. On coming out of Committee, Mr. Clayton
oolittle, Fessenden, lost, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Hamlin, Harlan, King, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Wade, and Wilson--19. 2. Resolved, That negro Slavery, as it exists in fifteen States of this Uni Connecticut, Collamer and Foot, of Vermont, King, of New York, Ten Eyck, of New Jersey, Pugh and Wade, of Ohio, Trumbull, of Illinois, Brigham and Chandler, of Michigan, Doolittle, of Wisconsin, Grim Harlan, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Latham, Polk, Pugh, Simmons, Ten Eyck, Toombs, Trumbull, Wade, and Wilson--26. Nays--Messrs. Benjamin, Bright, Brown, Chesnut, Clay, Davis, Fitzpatrick, Gred Pugh; Nays 12--Bingham, Chandler, Dixon, Foot, Foster, Hale, Pugh, Simmons, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, and Wilson. 0 7. Resolved, That the provision of the Constitution for the rendition of fugiti filled by Messrs. Ten Eyck and Thomson; while the Nays were Messrs. Chandler, Clark, Foot, Hale, Wade, and Wilson. The Senate then proceeded, on motion of Mr. Wilson, of Massachusetts, to reconsid
cky, proposing a Committee of Thirteen on the absorbing topic, came up in the Senate, and Mr. Benjamin F. Wade, of Ohio, uttered some weighty words on the general subject. Having shown that the GoverFessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson-25 [all Republicans]. Nays.--Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Cli20, 1860. appointed Messrs. Powell, Hunter, Crittenden, Seward, Toombs, Douglas, Collamer, Davis, Wade, Bigler, Rice, Doolittle, and Grimes on said Committee-five of the thirteen Republicans (in italiessrs. Bigler, Crittenden, Douglas, Rice, and Powell-5; Nays, Messrs. Davis, Doolittle, Collamer, Wade, Toombs, Grimes, and Hunter--7: absent, Mr. Seward. Messrs. Hunter, Toombs, and Davis, it is saidd by the following vote: Yeas--Messrs. Powell, Hunter, Crittenden, Seward, Douglas, Collamer, Wade, Bigler, Rice, Doolittle, and Grimes-11. Nays--Messrs. Davis and Toombs-2. Second, The Fugi
her than let Johnston escape. And, at 4 o'clock, I should have moved over that road for that purpose, if I had had no further orders. But, a little after 12 o'clock at night [July 16th-17th], I received a long order of three pages from Gen. Patterson, instructing me to move on to Charlestoun, which is nearly at right angles to the road I was going to move on, and twenty-two miles from Winchester. This was after I had given my orders for the other movement. Question by the Chairman: [Senator Wade] And that left Johnston free? Answer: Yes, sir; left him free to make his escape, which he did. * * * Question: In what direction would Johnston have had to move to get by you? Answer: Right out to the Shenandoah river, which he forded. He found out from his cavalry, who were watching us, that we were actually leaving, and he started at 1 o'clock that same day, with 8,000 men, forded the Shenandoah where it was so deep that he ordered his men to put their cart-ridge-boxes on the
is, Howe, Johnson, of Tenn., King, Lane, of Ind., Lane, of Kansas, McDougall, Morrill, Pomeroy, Sherman, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Wade, Willey, and Wilson--30. The original amendment was then rejected, so as to strike out all these declaratory propositi of Tenn., Kennedy, King, Lane, of Ind., Lane, of Kansas, Latham, Morrill, Nesmith, Pomeroy, Saulsbury, Sherman, Ten Eyck, Wade, Wilkinson, Willey, and Wilson-30. Nays--Messrs. Breckinridge, Johnson, of Mo., Polk, Powell, Trumbull--5. This dayster, Grimes, Hale, Harris, King, Lane, of Ind., Lane, of Kansas, McDougall, Sherman, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, and Wilson--24. Nays--Messrs. Breckinridge, Bright, Carlile, Cowan, Johnson, of Mo., Latham, Pearce, Polk, Powell, RicGrimes, Harris, Howe, King, Lane, of Ind., Lane, of Kansas, McDougall, Morrill, Rice, Sherman, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilmot, and Wilson--29. The bill increasing the pay of soldiers being that day under consideration, Mr. Wi
0; sends no delegates to the Kentucky Peace Convention, 495; allusion to her Disunion, 510; Convention between the State and the Confederacy, 516; Letcher calls out the militia to repel Federal invasion, 516-17; admitted into the Confederacy, and Gen. Lee placed in command of the Confederate forces, 518; boundary between West and Old Virginia, 527; the President's Message with regard to, 557. See West Virginia, Norfolk, Bethel, Bull Run, etc. voyages, Ocean, by 8th Census, 23. W. Wade, B. F., of Ohio, 231; 232; speech, 375-6. Walker, Mr., of Wisc., 172; 195. Walker, Robert J., Governor of Kansas, 249. Walker, L. P., of Ala., 312; 313; withdraws at Charleston, 314; speech after fall of Sumter, 458; 632. Walker, William, his invasion of Nicaragua, and his death, 276-7. Wallace, Col. Lewis, 535. Walworth, R. H., at Tweddle Hall, 393-4. Washburne, Mr., of Ill., 305; 560. Washington, George, letter to Laurens, 19; 42; 43; letters to Lafayette, 51; 81; 82