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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 159 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 52 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 48 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 46 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 35 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 32 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 30 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 26 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 25 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 18, 1862., [Electronic resource] 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for James S. Wadsworth or search for James S. Wadsworth in all documents.

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ight and next morning. The troops at Fairfax station leaving by the cars took with them the bulk of the supplies which had been sent there. My aide-de-camp, Major Wadsworth, stayed at Fairfax court-house till late in the morning, to see that the stragglers, and weary and worn-out soldiers, were not left behind. I transmit herey are as follows: First Lieutenant H. W. Kingsbury, Fifth Artillery, aide-de-camp. Major Clarence S. Brown, New York Militia Volunteers, aide-de-camp. Major James S. Wadsworth, New York Militia Volunteers, aide-de-camp; the latter, who does me the honor to be on my personal staff, had a horse shot under him in the hottest of thdeep enough to afford shelter, and I kept the several regiments in it as long as possible; but when the Wisconsin Second was abreast of the enemy, by order of Maj. Wadsworth, of Gen. McDowell's staff, I ordered it to leave the roadway by the left flank and to attack the enemy. This regiment ascended to the brow of the hill steadi
issued, inclusive of that day, and next day the men had eaten up or wasted the two days rations in one, and had nothing. They were badly provided with food and with water on the very day of the action, and some men told me that evening they had eaten nothing since 2 1/2 A. M. Indeed, the General witnessed the disorder which was caused by the regiments rushing out of the ranks to drink at a small stream before they went into action, though their canteens were filled before they set out. Mr. Wadsworth, a gentleman of New York of large fortune, who, with the rank of Major, is acting as aide-decamp to the General, had just come in from Centreville from the Confederates, to whom he had gone yesterday with a flag of truce, relative to the dead and wounded. They would not permit him to enter their lines, but otherwise received him courteously, and forwarded his despatches. This morning he was told that an answer would be sent in due time to his despatches, and he was ordered to return to
ttering among the trees the bright bayonets of our long line of troops,--while the artillery was just crossing the road by which we were approaching. We pushed our carriage into the front, and very soon overtook Gen. McDowell and his staff, Major Wadsworth and Major Brown, accompanied by Capt. Whipple of the Topographical Engineers. We learned that this was one of four columns on their march under orders to converge at Fairfax Court House. It consisted of about 6,000 men, and was led by the he van. They sleep and bivouac in the yards of the houses. The handsome figure and face of Col. Burnside can be seen everywhere. Col. Hunter, with his quiet, gentlemanly manner, is directing the lines, and Gen. McDowell, with Maj. Brown and Maj. Wadsworth, are sitting their horses, and watching with their glasses the very dark lines on the hills about a mile to the south, which show that Gen. Tyler is approaching. Now the Rhode Island First goes by, and the New Hampshire Second, (a New Hampsh