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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 159 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 52 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 48 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 46 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 35 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 32 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 30 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 26 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 25 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 18, 1862., [Electronic resource] 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for James S. Wadsworth or search for James S. Wadsworth in all documents.

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Newport on the afternoon of the third, in command of twenty men, with orders to make a more thorough search of the neighborhood of Pamunkey; also to arrest certain individuals suspected of entertaining parties who belonged to the opposite shore. I released them, however, because of insufficient proof against them. Left Pamunkey the sixth instant, at eight A. M., and arrived in Washington at three P. M. The cases of Mr. C. C. Spaulding and Mr. E. Lee Spaulding were investigated by General Wadsworth. The former was pronounced guilty of having violated the blockade, fined three hundred dollars, and released; the latter was pronounced innocent. Mr. C. C. Spaulding paid the fine with great willingness, and, I have no doubt, considers it but a small percentage upon the thousands he has amassed in this illegal traffic. This contraband trade can be followed with impunity anywhere between about four miles below Fort Washington to the mouth of the Potomac. The blockade cannot be effec
ineer Brigade, who joined us with a light canvas pontoon train. My personal aides-de-camp were Major E. B. Cope, a most valuable topographical officer; Captain James S. Wadsworth, son of the lamented General James S. Wadsworth; and Captain Gordon Winslow, son of the like lamented Rev. Gordon Winslow. Battle of Quaker road. General James S. Wadsworth; and Captain Gordon Winslow, son of the like lamented Rev. Gordon Winslow. Battle of Quaker road. We left our camp, in rear of the lines at Petersburg, at three A. M., on March twenty-ninth. We moved south, across Rowanty Creek, below the junction of Gravelly and Hatcher's Runs, took the road thence to Dinwiddie Court House, as far as the Quaker Road, then turned up this latter, and crossed Gravelly Run. A sharp engagementn the right road, I sent the order to General Ayres, commanding Second division (who was further off to the right), by one of your Aids, either Major Cope or Captain Wadsworth. The orders were obeyed promptly, and the troops moved out as expeditiously as the nature of the road and the crowded state it was in (being blocked up wi